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Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) comic books

  • Issue #351-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 351-1ST

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    Volume 351 - 1st printing. "British Air Forces 1914-18 (2)!" Written by Andrew Cormack. Art by Peter Cormack. The outbreak of World War I found the British Army's Royal Flying Corps with just over 200 fragile, unarmed reconnaissance aircraft, and a uniformed strength of just over 2,000 all ranks; the Royal Naval Air Service had some 50 seaplanes. By the Armistice of 1918 the unified Royal Air Force was the largest in the world, with about 22,650 aeroplanes - including a strategic bomber force - and 27,330 men operating from some 700 bases. This second in a two-part study covers RAF, WRAF and RAFNS uniforms from the unification of the service in April 1918; and the whole span of flying clothing during the Great War. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #352-1ST
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    Volume 352 - 1st printing. "The United States Army 1783–1811!" Written by James Kochan. Art by David Rickman. When the Revolutionary War ended Washington's victorious Continental Army was disbanded. The infant United States had very mixed feelings about standing armies; but years of Indian-fighting on the frontier emphasised the need for a force larger than Josiah Harmar's original 700-man 1st American Regiment. In the event Secretary Hamilton's far-sighted reforms, which produced 'Wayne's Legion' in the early 1790s, were to be short-lived, and it took later threats of international war to stimulate the eventual expansion of the young US Army. James Kochan's meticulously researched study of a dramatic and confused period in American military history - the years of St Clair's disaster, 'Mad Anthony' Wayne's victory at Fallen Timbers, and Harrison's at Tippecanoe - is illustrated with many rare and important paintings and drawings. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #353-1ST
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    Volume 353 - 1st printing. "The Italian Army 1940–45 (3)!" Written by Philip Jowett. Art by Stephen Andrew. Immediately after the Allied invasion of Italy in September 1943, Mussolini was deposed and the new Italian government switched sides. The German occupying forces swiftly freed Il Duce and ruthlessly disarmed the Italian Army; and from then until the end of the war in April 1945 Italian troops fought on both sides - with the forces of the new Fascist 'Salo Republic', in the Allied 'Co-Belligerent Forces', and in the Partisan movement. This period of bitter struggle saw the appearance of many new units and a wide range of interesting uniforms, described and illustrated in this final part of Philip Jowett's comprehensive three-volume series. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #354-1ST
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    Volume 354 - 1st printing. "The British Army 1939–45 (1)!" Written by Martin Brayley. Art by Mike Chappell. The Second World War was Britain's last conflict as a world power. For a year it saw Britain standing alone against the fascist dictatorships; winning it demanded the sacrifice of the entire national wealth. This first book of three describes the uniforms developed for European service. It traces the appearance of the 'Tommy' from pre-war mobilization, through the years of defeat and endurance, to D-Day and the long fighting advance to Northern Germany. The book also includes a campaign summary, infantry organization tables, lists of arms and services and basic specifications of a number of heavy weapons. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #355-1ST
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    Volume 355 - 1st printing. "Wellington's Belgian Allies 1815!" Written by Ronald Pawly. Art by Patrice Courcelle. The army commanded by the Duke of Wellington at Quatre-Bras and Waterloo included two infantry divisions and three cavalry brigades of the newly-unified Netherlands (or 'Dutch-Belgian') army. The part played by these troops in the two battles, under experienced officers many of whom had seen long service in Napoleon's campaigns, has often been unjustly dismissed by British commentators. The organisation, uniforms, and battle record of the Belgian units are explained here in detail by an experienced researcher in Continental archives, and illustrated by a specialist in the period, who actually lives at Waterloo. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #356-1ST
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    Volume 356 - 1st printing. "Armies in the Balkans 1914–18!" Written by Nigel Thomas and Dusan Babac. Art by Darko Pavlovic. Recent history should remind us that it was events in the Balkans which sparked off the Great War, with the assassination of the Austrian heir Prince Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo, and the consequent invasion of Serbia by Austro-Hungarian armies on 2 August 1914. Nevertheless, the subsequent four-year war in that theatre is always overshadowed by the simultaneous campaigns on the Western Front. For the first time this book offers a concise account of these complex campaigns, the organisation, orders of battle, and the uniforms and insignia of the armies involved: Austro-Hungarian, German, Ottoman, Serbian, Montenegrin, Albanian, British, French, Italian, Russian, Bulgarian, Greek and Rumanian. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #357-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 357-1ST

    Volume 357 - 1st printing. "World War II Allied Women's Services!" Written by Martin Brayley. Art by Ramiro Bujeiro. The contribution of women to the Allied war effort in 1939-45 was massive. Apart from their many vital roles 'on the home front', about a million Soviet, 500,000 British and 200,000 American women, and tens of thousands from other Allied nations, served in uniform with the armed forces. To put these figures in perspective: enough American women served to free sufficient able-bodied men to form 15 infantry divisions. It was not only in the USSR that their duties took them into harm's way; hundreds of British Commonwealth and US servicewomen died, and many were decorated. This book gives a concise introduction to the organisation and uniforms of these services, with an emphasis on the British and US forces. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #358-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 358-1ST

    Volume 358 - 1st printing. "The Portuguese Army of the Napoleonic Wars (3)!" Written by René Chartrand. Art by Bill Younghusband. This remarkable three-part study will transform the research material available to the English-speaking student of the Peninsular War. Most know that Wellington's Portuguese troops were praised as the 'fighting cocks' of his army; fewer appreciate that they represented between half and one-third of his entire forces. Similarly, most uniform historians have been limited to a few half-understood paintings by Dighton, and brief notes from secondary sources. René Chartrand's recent primary research in Portuguese and British archives now offers a wealth of new material. This third volume covers the artillery, militia, Ordenanza, volunteers, troops in the off-shore colonies, navy, and decorations. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #359-1ST
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    Volume 359 - 1st printing. "Canadian Forces in World War II!" Written by René Chartrand. Art by Ronald Volstad. Canada was the first Commonwealth country to send troops to Britain in 1939. During 1939-45 hundreds of thousands of Canadians - more than 40 per cent of the male population between the ages of 18 and 45, and virtually all of them volunteers - enlisted. Canadians fought with tragic courage at Hong Kong and Dieppe; with growing strength and confidence in Sicily, Italy and Normandy; and finally provided an entire Army for the liberation of NW Europe. This concise account of an extraordinary national effort in the cause of freedom is supported by data tables, photos, and eight colour plates by Canada's most knowledgeable military illustrator. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #360-1ST
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    Volume 360 - 1st printing. "The Thracians 700 BC–AD 46!" Written by Christopher Webber. Art by Angus McBride. Throughout the three centuries before Christ many hundreds of thousands of Thracians, in more than 40 tribes, occupied the area between northern Greece, southern Russia and north-west Turkey. Skilled horsemen, masters of light infantry fighting in broken terrain, and renowned for their ferocity, the Thracians were feared by even the greatest of their contemporaries, who were eager to employ them as mercenaries. After surviving invasions by the Persians, Greeks, Macedonians and Celts, the Thracians were finally conquered by Rome in AD 46. This concise but lavishly illustrated study of their history and material culture includes the results of the latest archaeological research, notably some remarkable tomb paintings. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #361-1ST
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    Volume 361 - 1st printing. "Axis Cavalry in World War II!" Written by Jeffrey T Fowler. Art by Mike Chappell. It is often forgotten that the German Wehrmacht of 1939-45 relied heavily upon horses. Not only was the majority of Army transport and much of the artillery dependent on draught horse teams; the Germans also kept a horse-mounted cavalry division in the field until the end of 1941. After withdrawing it, they discovered a need to revive and greatly expand their cavalry units in 1943-45. The Army and Waffen-SS cavalry proved their worth on the Russian Front, supported by other Axis cavalry contingents - Romanian, Hungarian, Italian, and locally recruited. In this book an experienced horseman describes that last generation of horse-soldiers in a text supported by tables, photographs, and meticulous colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #362-1ST
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    Volume 362 - 1st printing. "The Japanese Army 1931–45 (1)!" Written by Philip Jowett. Art by Stephen Andrew. During Japan's devastating Pacific offensive of 1941/42, the Allies paid a high price for their failure to take seriously an army which had already been fighting in Manchuria and China for ten years. That army was a unique blend of the ancient and the modern and its up-to-date equipment and resourceful tactics served an almost medieval code of unquestioning obedience and ruthless aggression. This first of two titles covers the organisation, equipment, uniforms and character of Japanese ground forces in the Chinese and early Pacific campaigns, illustrated with insignia charts, many rare photographs, and eight meticulous uniform plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #363-1ST
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    Volume 363 - 1st printing. "Germany's Eastern Front Allies (2)!" Written by Carlos Caballero Jurado and Nigel Thomas. Art by Darko Pavlovic. The Baltic nations - Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - enjoyed a brief independence between the World Wars before being annexed by the USSR in 1940. The grim experience of Soviet occupation made it inevitable that after the German invasion of Russia in 1941 they would fight beside the Wehrmacht as allies against the Red Army while always hoping for restored independence. That hope was crushed again in 1944-45; yet 'Forest Brother' guerrillas continued to fight against hopeless odds for years after the second Soviet occupation. This extraordinary story is illustrated here with rare photos, insignia charts, tables of units and detailed uniform plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #364-1ST
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    Volume 364 - 1st printing. "The Russian Army 1914–18!" Written by Nik Cornish. Art by Andrei Karachtchouk. Often overshadowed by the drama of its catastrophic collapse in the November 1917 Revolution, the Imperial Russian Army's record in 1914-16 included some notable victories. Its human qualities of patriotism and endurance were remarkable, and in 1916 the 'Brusilov Offensive' on the South-Western Front outdistanced anything that was being achieved in France. The variety and romance of its uniforms - infantry and cavalry, Guards and Line, Cossacks, armour and Air Service crewmen, even a priest - are splendidly captured here by Russia's leading military artist; and Nik Cornish's expert text is supported by tables of insignia and many rare photographs. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #365-1ST
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    Volume 365 - 1st printing. "World War II German Battle Insignia!" Written by Gordon Williamson. Art by Darko Pavlovic. The remarkable war effort of the German armed forces on three fronts between 1939 and 1945 was recognised by a wider range of insignia than seen in the Allied armies. While the Wehrmacht displayed fewer unit insignia than the Allies, a glance at a German soldier's tunic could reveal much more about his actual combat experience. In this book an experienced researcher explains and illustrates the Battle and Assault Badges of the Army, Waffen-SS and Luftwaffe ground troops; the sleeve shields and cuffbands issued to mark service in particular campaigns; wound badges, commemorative medals, and other types of insignia. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #366-1ST
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    Volume 366 - 1st printing. "Colonial American Troops 1610–1774 (1) !" Written by René Chartrand. Art by David Rickman. From the earliest English settlements the survival of the infant colonies in North America depended upon local militias. Throughout the 17th and early 18th centuries the burden of successive wars with the American Indians, and with the regular troops and militias of Britain's colonial rivals France and Spain, fell mainly upon locally raised volunteers. This first of a fascinating three-part study includes a general introduction and chronology, and chapters on Crown troops in North America; and begins a colony-by-colony review of militias and provincial units. The text is illustrated with rare early images and with eight specially commissioned full colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #367-1ST
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    Volume 367 - 1st printing. "Medieval Russian Armies 1250–1500!" Written by Viacheslav Shpakovsky and David Nicolle. Art by Angus McBride. After disastrous defeats at the hands of the Mongols in the 13th century, the Russian principalities became vassals of the Khans of the Golden Horde for more then 200 years; and at the same time the western princes faced the German crusaders of the Teutonic Order. Remarkably, Russia responded with a new surge of military vigour. Eventually, freedom from the 'Mongol yoke' coincided with a degree of unity around a powerful new state - Muscovy. This exciting chapter of history is illustrated with rare early paintings, photos, diagrams, and eight plates reconstructing the mixed influences of East and West in the appearance of Russian warriors. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #368-1ST
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    Volume 368 - 1st printing. "The British Army 1939–45 (2)!" Written by Martin Brayley. Art by Mike Chappell. The scope of Britain's wartime Middle East Command stretched far beyond the Libyan desert where the 8th Army's most famous battles were fought - from Gibraltar and Tunisia in the west, to Iraq and Persia in the east, and from Greece south to the Gulf of Aden. In 1940-43 this was the only arena where the British Army could take the ground war to the German Wehrmacht; it saw a succession of setbacks and triumphs, until spring 1945 found the 8th Army victorious in northern Italy. A summary of these campaigns is illustrated by photographs, and detailed colour plates of the wide range of uniforms worn in the varied conditions of this huge theatre of war. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #369-1ST
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    Volume 369 - 1st printing. "The Japanese Army 1931–45 (2)!" Written by Philip Jowett. Art by Stephen Andrew. Within months of its greatest triumph in 1942, the Japanese Imperial Army began to face the difficulties which would eventually destroy it - overstretched supply lines, and inadequate industrial support. Yet as the Allies grew steadily stronger and more skilful, the Japanese Army and Naval Landing Forces dug in to defend their conquests with a determination which shocked all who fought them. In this second book the author describes the deployments, organisation, uniforms and equipment of the Army - including the dreaded Kempei-tai military police - the naval infantry, paratroopers, special raiding units, and foreign auxiliaries during the long and savage war in Burma and the Pacific. His text is illustrated with many rare photographs, three insignia charts, and eight highly detailed colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #370-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 370-1ST

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    Volume 370 - 1st printing. "World War II Allied Nursing Services!" Written by Martin Brayley. Art by Ramiro Bujeiro. The skill and care of the women of the Allied military nursing services was remembered gratefully by hundreds of thousands of wounded servicemen. The small peacetime services increased rapidly by enrolling reservists and volunteers; the great majority of the nurses who cared for Allied casualties were 'civilians in uniform', who worked tirelessly under difficult conditions and - in tented hospitals close to the front lines - in real danger; many nurses paid for their devotion with their lives. This first-ever fully illustrated study of the US, British, Commonwealth, and other nursing organisations includes many unpublished photographs and 24 meticulously illustrated colour figures. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #371-1ST
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    Volume 371 - 1st printing. "Wellington's Dutch Allies 1815!" Written by Ronald Pawly. Art by Patrice Courcelle. The forces commanded by the Duke of Wellington at Quatre-Bras and Waterloo included two infantry divisions and three cavalry brigades of the newly unified ('Dutch-Belgian') army of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, mostly led by veteran officers who had served under Napoleon. The part played by these troops - particularly in holding the vital crossroads of Quatre-Bras, at the insistence of their own commanders - has often been unjustly dismissed by British commentators. In this book the history, organisation, uniforms and battle record of the Dutch units of this army are explained and illustrated in detail by two experienced researchers in Continental archives, and illustrated with many rare portraits as well as meticulous colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #372-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 372-1ST

    Volume 372 - 1st printing. "Colonial American Troops 1610-1774 (2) !" Written by René Chartrand. Art by David Rickman. From the earliest English settlements the survival of the infant colonies in North America depended upon local militias. Throughout the 17th and most of the 18th century royal troops were seldom shipped out from Britain, and the main burden of successive wars with the American Indians, and with the regular troops and militias of Britain's colonial rivals France and Spain, usually fell upon locally raised soldiers. These units also fought alongside the Crown forces during major operations such as the French-Indian War of the 1750s. This second of a fascinating three-part study covers the militias and provincial troops raised in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Maryland, New York and New Jersey. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #373-1ST
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    Volume 373 - 1st printing. "The Sarmatians 600 BC–AD 450!" Written by Richard Brzezinski. Art by Gerry Embleton. The Sarmatians - one of the many nomadic groups to emerge from the great Eurasian Steppe - crossed the Don in about the 3rd century BC to displace their western neighbours, the Scythians, in the lands north of the Black Sea. Later they burst into Asia Minor and Rome's Danube provinces, becoming famous for the prowess of their lance-armed cavalry - first as enemies, and later as allies of Rome. They influenced Rome's adoption of heavy armoured cavalry, and in Roman service they were even posted to Britain. Drawing upon a wide reading of Classical authors and of Russian archaeological publications, this fascinating study is the first major English language attempt to reconstruct their armour, equipment and tactics. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #374-1ST
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    Volume 374 - 1st printing. "Roman Military Clothing (1)!" Written by Graham Sumner. Art by Graham Sumner. The armour and weapons of Rome's legionaries and auxiliaries have been the subject of intense research and speculation, and much has been published - but almost nothing on the actual clothing of Imperial soldiers. In this first part of a rigorous study of the literary, sculptural, pictorial and archaeological evidence, a specialist author/artist examines the clues which enable us to attempt reconstructions of tunics, cloaks, footwear and other items worn by officers and men all over the empire, from the late Republic to c.200 AD. His text is illustrated with meticulous drawings of surviving relief sculptures - particularly soldiers' gravestones - and eight striking colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #375-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 375-1ST

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    Volume 375 - 1st printing. "The British Army 1939-45 (3)!" Written by Martin Brayley. Art by Mike Chappell. The lightning Japanese offensives in the Far East in 1941/42 inflicted a series of costly defeats on the ill-prepared and badly supported British Commonwealth forces in Malaya and Burma. The 'forgotten' 14th Army on the India-Burma border slowly built up its strength and its tactical expertise; and Wingate's 'Chindits' proved that units supplied from the air could operate deep behind enemy lines. In 1944 General Slim's troops decisively smashed Japan's last offensive at Imphal and Kohima; and over the next year they drove the enemy relentlessly back through Burma, reducing them to starving fugitives by the final victory in August 1945. This concise summary of Britain's Far East campaigns is illustrated with many rare photographs, and eight detailed colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #376-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 376-1ST

    Volume 376 - 1st printing. "Italian Medieval Armies 1000-1300!" Written by David Nicolle. Art by Angus McBride. As early as the 11th century, Italian warfare was developing along lines which were unique in medieval Europe. This fragmented, cosmopolitan region, increasingly rich from international trade, saw the rise of independent cities able to fund armies of urban militia, sometimes defying the traditional feudal aristocracy. Against this background regional powers - the Normans, the Papacy, the German Emperors, the Angevins and Aragonese - manoeuvred for advantage. This engrossing account of the armies of northern and southern Italy - their organisation, command structure, strategy, tactics and fortifications - is illustrated with rare manuscript images, diagrams of fortifications, and eight striking colour plates showing armour and weapons of all types. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #377-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 377-1ST

    Volume 377 - 1st printing. "Luftwaffe Air & Ground Crew 1939-45!" Written by Robert F Stedman. Art by Mike Chappell. The Luftwaffe, honed in the Spanish Civil War, played a vital part in Germany's 'Blitzkrieg' victories in 1939-41. Badly overstretched by war on three fronts in 1942-44, it was crippled by an incompetent commander-in-chief, the losses among experienced aircrew, and shortage of fuel. In 1944-45 it faced a final battle of attrition in skies ruled by the Allies as the Eastern and Western pincers closed on the Reich; but until the very end the dwindling band of veteran pilots - among them the greatest 'aces' the world has ever known - presented a potent threat. This fact-packed review of Luftwaffe uniforms and flying kit is illustrated with rare personal photos, insignia charts, and two dozen meticulously detailed colour figures. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #378-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 378-1ST

    Volume 378 - 1st printing. "Napoleon's Guards of Honour!" Written by Ronald Pawly. Art by Patrice Courcelle. One of the least understood of Napoleon's corps were the four regiments of Gardes d'honneur, raised in 1813 during the frantic rebuilding of the French cavalry after the huge losses in Russia. Recruited from the leading social classes, uniformed and equipped at their own expense, and accompanied by servants to take care of such unpleasant chores as stable duty, these men were promised commissions as officers after a year's service in the ranks. Though spectacularly unready for combat upon their arrival with the army, the Guards of Honour would gain skill and confidence while serving alongside the élite cavalry of the Imperial Guard in the campaigns of Saxony and France, 1813-14, and distinguished themselves in battle at Hanau and Rheims. The story of their organisation, uniforms and service is researched from rare archives and memoirs, and illustrated with portraits, surviving uniform items, and meticulous colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #379-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 379-1ST

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    Volume 379 - 1st printing. "Armies in East Africa 1914–18!" Written by Peter Abbott. Art by Raffaele Ruggeri. One of the least-published campaigns of the Great War was that fought in East Africa by forces of colonial troops – British Empire, Belgian, Portuguese and German. Short of resources, many European, African and Indian soldiers recorded epics of endurance as they hunted the outnumbered but brilliantly led German colonial forces across a disease-ridden wilderness. The achievements of Paul von Lettow Vorbeck – the last German commander in the field to lay down his arms – brought him fame and respect comparable to that won by Rommel in World War II. The events and the forces are described here in concise detail, and illustrated with rare photographs and striking colour artworks. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #380-1ST
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    Volume 380 - 1st printing. "German Army Elite Units 1939–45!" Written by Gordon Williamson. Art by Ramiro Bujeiro. In World War II a number of German Army units and divisions were classed as élites, and were distinguished by special insignia of various kinds. For some this status was simply a matter of lineage - e.g. the Infantry Regiment 'List', which traced its identity to the Bavarian unit with which Hitler had served in World War I. Some, like the 'Grossdeutschland' and Panzer-Lehr divisions, were raised from particularly high grade personnel. Other titles honoured extraordinary battlefield exploits or heroic sacrifice, like the 'Brandenburg' and 'Hoch und Deutschmeister' divisions. This fact-packed introduction to these famous units is illustrated with rare photographs and detailed colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #381-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 381-1ST

    Volume 381 - 1st printing. "Prussian Staff & Specialist Troops 1791-1815!" Written by Peter Hofschröer. Art by Christa Hook. The origins of what would become the German General Staff of the late 19th and 20th centuries - probably the most professional military machine in the world - can be traced to the Prussian Army of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. This concise study, concluding the author's series of five titles on the Prussian Army of 1792–1815, covers the staff; the reforms in tactical employment of all-arms brigades (which, contrary to received opinion, pre-dated the disasters of Jena and Auerstedt in 1806); the artillery and other technical troops; and regimental colours and standards. Among the illustrations are rare diagrams from the artillery drill manual of the day. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #382-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 382-1ST

    Volume 382 - 1st printing. "Wellington's Peninsula Regiments (1)!" Written by Mike Chappell. Art by Mike Chappell. The forces which Wellington led in Portugal and Spain and up into southern France between 1808 and 1814 achieved a consistent record of victory perhaps unmatched in the history of the British Army. Some 40 per cent of this volunteer army were Irishmen – a remarkable figure, given the recent unrest and bloodshed in Ireland. This book details the record, and illustrates the uniforms and equipment, of the two cavalry and three infantry units boasting formal Irish identity: the 4th (Royal Irish) Dragoon Guards, 18th Hussars, 27th (Enniskillen), 87th (Prince of Wales's Own Irish), and 88th (Connaught Rangers) Regiments of Foot. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #383-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 383-1ST

    Volume 383 - 1st printing. "Colonial American Troops 1610-1774 (3)!" Written by René Chartrand. Art by David Rickman. From the earliest English settlements the survival of the infant colonies in North America depended upon local militias. Before the mid-18th century royal troops were seldom shipped out from Britain, and the main burden of successive wars with the American Indians, and with Britain's colonial rivals France and Spain, fell upon locally raised units, which also fought alongside the Crown forces during the major operations of the French-Indian War of the 1750s. This final book of a fascinating three-part study covers the militias and provincial troops raised in the Carolinas, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Georgia, Nova Scotia, Hudson's Bay and Quebec Province; and also Rangers, and colors and standards. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #384-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 384-1ST

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    Volume 384 - 1st printing. "Armies of the German Peasants' War 1524-26!" Written by Douglas Miller. Art by Angus McBride. In the 1520s, a brief but savage war broke out in Germany when various insurgent groups rose to overthrow the power structure. The movement took as its emblem a peasant's shoe and the collective title of 'Bundschuh', and this became known as the Peasants' War - although the rebel armies actually included as many townsmen, miners, disaffected knights and mercenary soldiers as rural peasants. The risings involved large armies of up to 18,000 men, and there were several major battles before the movement was put down with the utmost ferocity. This book details the armies, tactics, costume, weapons, personalities and events of this savage war. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #385-1ST
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    Volume 385 - 1st printing. "The Hermann Göring Division!" Written by Gordon Williamson. Art by Stephen Andrew. Each of Germany's World War II armed services could claim one unit which earned a unique combat reputation, and which consequently was enlarged and developed far beyond the size originally planned. Hermann Göring, commander-in-chief of the air force, was determined that his Luftwaffe should share the glory of Germany's land conquests, and gave his name to a regimental combat group of infantry and Flak artillery. This élite unit was steadily enlarged into a brigade, then an armoured division, and finally into a two-division corps, fighting with distinction in Tunisia, Sicily, Italy, and on the Russian Front. This concise history is illustrated with rare personal photographs and eight colour plates, detailing the very varied uniforms and special insignia of this crack formation. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #386-1ST
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    Volume 386 - 1st printing. "The US Army of World War I!" Written by Mark Henry. Art by Stephen Walsh. When the USA entered World War I in April 1917 her Regular Army counted just 128,000 men and lacked all the necessary equipment and training for modern trench warfare. By the Armistice of November 1918, General John J.Pershing's American Expeditionary Force in France had more than 2 million men and was holding 25 per cent of the Western Front. They had helped smash Ludendorff's brilliant Operation Michael in the lines before Paris; had turned onto the offensive themselves at St Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne; and if Germany had not negotiated peace with unexpected speed the US Army would have taken over from their tired Allies an even greater share of the planned 1919 campaign. This concise account of America's first world class army, its organization, uniforms, weapons and character, is illustrated with rare photos and eight full color plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #387-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 387-1ST

    Volume 387 - 1st printing. "The Italian Army of World War I !" Written by David Nicolle. Art by Raffaele Ruggeri. The dilemma of the young Italian kingdom and the experience of her army in the Great War were unique among the combatant nations. Late to enter the war against the Central Powers, she faced a massively defended Austro-Hungarian front in the north, including strong mountain features, as well as distractions in the Balkans and a simultaneous rebellion in her Libyan colony. Costly and repeated battles on the Isonzo front culminated in the disaster of Caporetto in October 1917, followed by a remarkable revival and eventual victory in 1918. This concise study describes and illustrates the Italian Army's campaigns, organisation, uniforms, weapons and equipment – including the famous 'death companies' and Arditi assault troops. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #388-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 388-1ST

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    Volume 388 - 1st printing. "Zulu War -Volunteers, Irregulars & Auxiliaries!" Written by Ian Castle. Art by Raffaele Ruggeri. Mention of the Zulu War of 1879 inevitably conjures up images of the redcoats at Isandlwana and Rorke's Drift; it is often forgotten that the limited number of Imperial troops available led to the raising of several thousand local troops from Natal, Cape Colony and beyond. Typified by hard-riding white frontiersmen and lightly armed African infantry, these units made up for the British Army's severe shortage of cavalry scouts and local knowledge. Ian Castle's concise study of their organisation, uniforms, weapons, and campaign service covers a far wider range of units than ever previously published; it is illustrated with rare photographs and vivid colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #389-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 389-1ST

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    Volume 389 - 1st printing. "Napoleon's Red Lancers!" Written by Ronald Pawly. Art by Patrice Courcelle. The legendary Dutch 'Red' Lancers - the 2nd Light Horse Lancers of Napoleon's Imperial Guard - were formed in 1810 after the emperor annexed Holland and its army to France. The former hussars of the Dutch Royal Guard got a handsome new uniform, a new weapon, and a hard-driving new colonel in Baron Edouard Colbert. His lancers distinguished themselves in Russia in 1812, at huge cost; in Germany in 1813, and in the Low Countries in 1814. When Napoleon returned from exile in 1815 the Red Lancers were with him until night fell over Waterloo. Ronald Pawly is the world's leading expert on the archival and pictorial record left by this regiment; his detailed text is illustrated with rare portraits and photographs, and eight glowing colour plates of a surprisingly wide variety of uniforms. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #390-1ST
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    Volume 390 - 1st printing. "Roman Military Clothing (2)!" Written by Graham Sumner. Art by Graham Sumner. The armour and weapons of the Roman army have long been the subject of intense research and speculation. While much has been published on their arms and armour, however, the actual clothing of Imperial soldiers has largely been overlooked. In this second part of a rigorous study of the literary, sculptural, pictorial and archaeological evidence, the specialist author-artist examines the clues which enable us to attempt reconstructions of items worn by officers and men all over the empire during the two centuries between the reign of Septimius Severus and the twilight years of Stilicho. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #391-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 391-1ST

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    Volume 391 - 1st printing. "The British Army in World War I (1)!" Written by Mike Chappell. Art by Mike Chappell. At the outbreak of World War I in August 1914 the British Army was unique: it was a small force raised entirely by voluntary recruitment. The first campaigns of the British Expeditionary Force brought admiration from the enemy, but by the end of 1914 it had been virtually eliminated. Kitchener's call for new volunteers drew such a patriotic response that by mid-1916 the BEF had grown to 55 divisions. This book explains and llustrates the uniform, equipment and organization of the British Army up to the end of the battle of the Somme. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #392-1ST
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    Volume 392 - 1st printing. "The Austro-Hungarian Forces in World War I (1)!" Written by Peter Jung. Art by Darko Pavlovic. The part played in the Great War by the army of the Austro-Hungarian Dual Monarchy is little known to English-speakers, perhaps because the end of the war saw the complete destruction of the Empire. Yet it was of central importance, providing nearly all Central Powers forces on the Italian front, huge numbers on the Russian front, seven Army Corps in the Balkans – and even a little-known contingent in Turkey and Palestine. The first half of the story of this complex multi-national organization at war is described here in a concise but detailed text, supported by data tables and an insignia chart, and illustrated with rare photographs and colourful uniform plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #393-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 393-1ST

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    Volume 393 - 1st printing. "World War II German Women's Auxiliary Services!" Written by Gordon Williamson. Art by Ramiro Bujeiro. Under the Nazi regime, Hitler's conservative views on the place of housewives and mothers in society limited German women to a much less active role in the war than their British and Allied counterparts. Nevertheless, the demands of a prolonged war did see German women in a range of uniforms as auxiliaries with the Army, Navy, Air Force and SS, particularly in the signals and air defence services. This unique book explains and illustrates these organisations and their uniforms and insignia, as well as Red Cross nurses, and auxiliaries of the Labour Corps, Customs Service, National Socialist Women's Organisation, and League of German Maidens (Hitler Youth). Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #394-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 394-1ST

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    Volume 394 - 1st printing. "The German Army in World War I (1)!" Written by Nigel Thomas. Art by Gerry Embleton. In August 1914 the mobilization of Imperial Germany's 800,000-strong army ushered in the first great war of the modern age - a war which still stands as the greatest slaughter of soldiers in history. That German Army is also the best example of a particular period of military thought, when virtually the whole manpower of the European nations was integrated into mass conscript armies, supported by several age categories of reservists and by dedicated industrial and transport systems. In this first of three volumes the author offers an extraordinary mass of information, in text and tables, illustrated by photographs and colour plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #395-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 395-1ST

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    Volume 395 - 1st printing. "Tribes of the Iroquois Confederacy!" Written by Michael G Johnson. Art by Jonathan Smith. The Five (later Six) Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy were central to the story of the white colonization of the American Northeast. The European fur trade transformed their world, and the struggles between English and French colonists forced the tribes to take sides. Sir William Johnson's efforts in the Mohawk Valley ensured that the Iroquois Nations were allies of the British crown; and the loyalty of his kinsman Joseph Brant (Thayendanegea) during the American Revolution forced the Mohawks into Canadian exile. This richly illustrated book introduces Iroquois history, social organization, religion and material culture. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #396-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 396-1ST

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    Volume 396 - 1st printing. "Medieval Scandinavian Armies (1)!" Written by David Lindholm and David Nicolle. Art by Angus McBride. While Scandinavia's 'Viking Age' is one of the most studied aspects of early medieval history, much less has been published about the centuries that followed. Yet the armies of Sweden, Norway and Denmark offer fascinating differences from the rest of medieval Western Europe, both in their organisation and their war gear - due partly to their remoteness, climate and terrain, but partly to their long freedom from the feudal system of other kingdoms. This book explains the special nature of Scandinavian armies, shaped by the relative weakness of kings and aristocrats, and the contrasts between the separate nations of the North. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #397-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 397-1ST

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    Volume 397 - 1st printing. "The Austro-Hungarian Forces in World War I (2)!" Written by Peter Jung. Art by Darko Pavlovic. The part played in the Great War by the armies of the Austro-Hungarian Dual Monarchy is little known to English-speakers, perhaps because 1918 saw the complete destruction of the Empire. Yet it was of great importance, providing nearly all Central Powers forces on the Italian front, huge numbers on the Russian front, the Balkans and even a contingent in Turkey and Palestine. This second volume describes this complex organisation from the accession of Emperor Karl I in November 1916, through the victory of Caporetto and failure of the Piave offensive, to the final Armistice. The text is supported by tables and insignia charts, and illustrated with rare photographs and colourful plates. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #398-1ST
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    Volume 398 - 1st printing. "The Texan Army 1835–46!" Written by Stuart Reid. Art by Richard Hook. The volunteer army that fought the Mexican dictator Santa Anna from 1835 to 1836 was immortalized in the epic battle of the Alamo. Taking arms initially to fight for the restoration of the liberal Mexican constitution of 1824, the volunteers were eventually fighting for outright Texan independence. This book describes and illustrates the group of men who, despite the diversity of their origins, equipment, weaponry and dress, were united in a common cause that reached its culmination in the victory of San Jacinto. The turbulent decade (1836–46) of Texan independence is also covered, and the little-studied army and navy of the Republic of Texas examined. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #399-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 399-1ST

    Volume 399 - 1st printing. "Medieval Scandinavian Armies (2)!" Written by David Lindholm and David Nicolle. Art by Angus McBride. While Scandinavia's 'Viking Age' is one of the most studied aspects of early medieval history, much less has been published about the centuries which followed. Yet the armies of Sweden, Norway and Denmark offer fascinating differences from the rest of medieval Western Europe, both in their organisation and their war gear. This second of two books covers the period which saw both expansion in the Baltic, and long wars born of the attempt to bring Scandinavia under a single monarchy - the Union of Kalmar. In the North, as elsewhere, the perfection of plate armour could not prevent the steady decline in the importance of the 15th century mounted knight in favour of the well armed infantryman. Softcover, PC/PB&W.

  • Issue #400-1ST
    Osprey Men-at-Arms Series SC (1973-2011 OSPREY) 400-1ST

    Volume 400 - 1st printing. "Wellington's Peninsula Regiments (2)!" Written by Mike Chappell. Art by Mike Chappell. The forces which Wellington led in Portugal and Spain and up into southern France between 1808 and 1814 achieved a record of victory perhaps unmatched in the history of the British Army. Among his infantry the regiments of the Light Division were self-consciously an élite, trained to fight with initiative and independence on the exposed edges of the marching army. This book explains their evolution and tactics, details the campaigns in which they fought and illustrates the uniforms and equipment of the Light Infantry regiments: the 43rd (Monmouthshire), 52nd (Oxfordshire), 51st (2nd Yorkshire), 68th (Durham) and 85th (Bucks Volunteers). Softcover, PC/PB&W.