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Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) comic books

  • Issue #101
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 101

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "The Mad Suburban Primer," script by Stan Hart, art by Bob Clarke; The drawbacks of living in the suburbs, presented as a child's primer. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "At the Elevators," script and art by Don Martin. "Voyage to See What's On the Bottom," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the "Voyage To the Bottom of the Sea" TV series: two incompetent naval officers investigate the death of a crew member aboard a hamster-powered submarine. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "The Lighter Side of Shopping," script and art by Dave Berg; The ironies and aggravations of shopping are portrayed. "Badge & Billy," script by Larry Siegel, art by George Woodbridge; A niche magazine for people in law enforcement. "Mad's Puzzle Page" by Al Jaffee. "Intimidations and Antidotes," script by Stan Hart, art by Joe Orlando; Strategies to counteract intimidating situations. "College Programs to Develop Masters of Mediocrity," script by Donald D. Shandler, art by Paul Coker Jr.; College courses designed to churn out minimally-skilled graduates. "The Sinpiper," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "The Sandpipers," a married priest is attracted to a shallow single mother and has a clandestine affair with her where they talk endlessly about nothing. "Another Great Bank Robbery," script and art by Don Martin. "How Do Bosses Plan To Celebrate Future Office Xmas Parties" Mad Fold-In, script and art by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #102
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 102

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Some Mad Suggestions for Other 'Ridiculous Ad Images," script by Phil Hahn and Jack Hanrahan, art by Bob Clarke; Endless variations on the Esso/Humble Oil ad campaign designed to sell other products. "In the Delicatessen," script and art by Don Martin; A customer accuses a deli clerk of cheating her. "BrandXed," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the TV series "Branded"; a dishonorably discharged cavalry officer roams the west and gets punched a lot. "Achieving Personal Success in Crime," script by Tom Koch, art by George Woodbridge; Educational pamphlet on how to be a better criminal. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "The Lighter Side of Elementary School," script and art by Dave Berg. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "National Perspirer," script by Larry Siegel, art by Al Jaffee; In a parody of supermarket tabloids, sensational and lurid news articles are accompanied by sensational and lurid illustrations. "ABC TV's Wide World of Sports," script by Al Jaffee, art by George Woodbridge. "The Typical Luxury Apartment House Ad," script by Larry Siegel, art by Joe Orlando; A glowing ad for an apartment house contrasted with the many blemishes the ad doesn't mention. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "Bubby Lake Missed (by a mile)", script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Bunny Lake Is Missing," a mother desperately searches for her missing daughter, with no help from her creepy husband, an idiot police officer or the egomaniacal director of the film. "How You Too Can Make a Fortune in the Booming Ski Business" Mad Fold-In, script and art by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #103
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 103

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. Cartoons in the margin by Sergio Aragones. "The Agony and the Agony," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "The Agony and the Ecstasy," a boxer and restaurateur commissions a famous artist to paint the ceiling of his restaurant and then micromanages the project to distraction. "Fathers Are Two-Time Losers," script by Stan Hart, art by George Woodbridge; A comparison of the restrictive childhoods today's fathers endured and the unfettered childhoods their children experience today. "The Haircut," script and art by Don Martin; A man falls victim to a defective barber's chair. "Mad's Share the Wealth Income Tax Form," script and art by Al Jaffee; Revamping the U.S. tax form to make it more fair to others. "The Lighter Side of Junior High," script and art by Dave Berg; The trials and tribulations of life in High School are examined. "The Face on the Town Square Walk," script by Tom Koch, art by Jack Davis; In a parody of the poem "The Face on the Barroom Floor," a Newport Beach motorcycle gang harass a timid soul on a bicycle. "Honey Waste," script by Tom Koch, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the TV series "Honey West"; a private detective is hired to keep a suitcase of laundry out of the hands of a Chinese tong. "Fraternity Magazine," script by Tom Koch, art by Joe Orlando; A niche magazine for college fraternities and their members. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #104
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 104

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Advertising Campaigns With Ulterior Motives," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Rickard; Examples of public service announcements that don't serve the public. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Future Wit & Wisdom Books," script by Phil Hahn and Jack Hanrahan, art by Mort Drucker; Books featuring humorous anecdotes and sayings from famous historical and contemporary people not known for being funny or clever. "In the Hospital," script and art by Don Martin; A patient gets a new IV drip. "Mixing Personal Politics with Careers," script by Frank Jacobs, art by George Woodbridge. "Mad Visits the American Mediocrity Academy," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Rickard; A visit to a teaching institution that trains people to be average. "The Lighter Side of High School," script and art by Dave Berg; The humorous trials and tribulations of attending high school. "Postage Stamp Advertising," script and art by Al Jaffee; Examples of what would happen if the U.S. Postal Service sold ad space on their postage stamps. "Loused Up in Space," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "Lost in Space," a family of incompetent space explorers find a planet full of giant gemstones, prompting The Professor to try to kill them--again. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #105
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 105
    Published Sep 1966 by EC.
    • Water saturation.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. Wire photo of a Rolling Stones press conference with a satirical word balloon added. "Bats-Man," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the television show "Batman"; tired of his double identity ruining his love life, Sparrow attempts to murder Bats-Man. "One Day on the Bridge," script and art by Don Martin; A good Samaritan tries to keep another man from committing suicide. Cartoons in the margin by Sergio Aragones. "The Lighter Side of Traveling," script and art by Dave Berg. "What Is a Party-Pooper?", script by Tom Koch, art by Sergio Aragones; Essay on people who are no fun. "If Other Publications Used Those Sensational Movie Mag Cover Gimicks," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Rickard; Specialty magazines use Jacqueline Kennedy on their cover in genre-specific situations to spur sales. "Hullabadig Au Go Go," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Jack Davis; In a parody of teenage dance party programs, a Dick Clark-like host introduces acts that resemble The Who, The Supremes, and Bob Dylan. "Specialized Cook Books," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by George Woodbridge. "A Mad Look at Shut-Ins," script and art by Al Jaffee; Series of cartoons with a theme of people in prison. "The Spy That Came In for the Gold," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "The Spy Who Came In from the Cold"; a British Intelligence Agent pretends to have a breakdown hoping to invite an attempt from opposing agents to turn him. "What Awesome Beast Threatens Unwary Campers Every Year" Mad Fold-in by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #106
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 106
    • INCOMPLETE. Multiple pages missing. Interrupts art and story.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "The Bunch," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "The Group," at a class reunion for a women's college, a group of uninteresting women relate their uninteresting post-graduate lives. "A Mad Look at Trade-Marks," script and art by Max Brandel. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Late One Night," script and art by Don Martin; A wife remedies her husband's snoring. "The Lighter Side of Music Lovers," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical look at common people and their taste in music. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "The Mad Air Travel Primer," script by Larry Siegel, art by George Woodbridge. "A Mad Look at the Joys of Scuba Diving," script by Al Jaffee and Dick DeBartolo, art by Bob Clarke. "Mad Visits a Typical Johnson Howard's Restaurant," script by Larry Siegel, art by Paul Coker Jr.; Satirical look at the Howard Johnson's restaurant chain. "A Mad Look at Batman," script and art by Sergio Aragones. "Obituaries for Comic Strip Characters," script by Frank Jacobs. "12 O'Crocked High," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "12 O'clock High," a World War II bomber crashes in occupied France and its crew must find its way to friendly lines before the pilot and co-pilot kill each other. "What Profitable Car-Buyer Market Will Automakers Stupidly Lose Again With This Year's Models," Mad Fold-in, script and art by Al Jaffee. "Early One Morning in the Jungle," script by Don Edwing, art by Frank Frazetta; Tarzan loses his title as "King of the Apes." 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #107
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 107

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Hello, Lyndon, or My Fair Lady Bird," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; President Johnson's first year in the White House portrayed as a Broadway musical. "Mad's Puzzle Page," script and art by Al Jaffee. "Mad's Academy Awards For Teenagers," script by Stan Hart, art by Jack Rickard; Nominees for the most melodramatic performances by a teen not getting their way. "The Shadow Knows," script and art by Sergio Aragones; Examples of shadows doing what their owners don't have the nerve to do. "The Lighter Side of Autumn," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical look at every day occurrences associated with autumn. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "The Astrodome," script by Tom Koch and May Sakami, art by Don Martin; Parody of the poem "Kubla Khan"; an ode to Houston's new baseball stadium. "The Mad Comic Strip Characters' Forum on Current Affairs," script by Frank Jacobs and Dotty Brooks (plot concept), art by Bob Clarke; Comic strips characters discuss serious social issues. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "The Miss American Beauty Pagent," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of beauty pageants, a collection of airheads compete for a sham title while celebrity judges plug their products and the audience ogles the contestants. "A Mad Porfolio of Fotos That Compare the Savage Society & the Great Society," script by Max Brandel. "Protest Magazine," script by Larry Siegel, art by George Woodbridge; A niche magazine for protesters. "What's the Dirtiest Play in Modern Football" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #108
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 108

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Hokum's Heroes," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Davis; Parody of the TV show "Hogan's Heroes"; the head officer of the prisoners in a Nazi prison camp can't enjoy all of the secret benefits of the camp because he is worried about the future. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Another Visit With a Sculptor," script and art by Don Martin; A sculptor finishes his masterpiece. "Christmas Cards We'd Like to See," script and art by Max Brandel; Christmas cards that use contemporary urban scenery and celebrities rather than traditional fare. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "More Snappy Answers to Those Old Cliches," script by Stan Hart, art by Paul Coker Jr.; Sarcastic responses to time worn holiday season situations. "Ads for Other 1967 Vehicles," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Bob Clarke; Consumer advertisements for non-consumer vehicles. "A Portfolio of Mad Namelies," script and art by Max Brandel; Names of famous people with objects representing what they are famous for replacing certain letters. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "What is a B.M.O.C.?", script by Tom Koch, art by Sergio Aragones; Examination of what makes a student the "Big Man on Campus." "Telephone Solicitors," script and art by Al Jaffee; Ideas on how to combat telephone solicitors. "The Lighter Side of Mail," script and art by Dave Berg; Examples of human failings and frailties related to the postal service. "Football as Covered by Other Publications," script by Frank Jacobs, art by George Woodbridge; Football stories written for non-sports niche magazines. "The Sound of Money," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "The Sound Of Music"; a failed novitiate becomes a governess for the children of a Baron and they fall in love amid some really bad songs. "A Christmas Message from Santa Claus" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #109
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 109
    • 3/4" spine split. Staple rust. Rust migration.
    • Interior is complete. Full length spine split, both covers completely detached.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. Statement of ownership; Total paid circulation, 12 month average: 1,635,612. "Who in Heck is Virginia Woolfe?", script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf," a warring couple have another couple over for drinks and proceed to embarrass themselves. "Correspondence Schools For Repulsive People" photo story, script by Phil Hahn and Jack Hanrahan. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "In the Locker Room," script and art by Don Martin; A football coach tries to improve a player's football knowledge. "The Lighter Side of Arguments," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical look at disputes between family and friends. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "Idiot-Proof Products," script and art by Al Jaffee; Products designed to be simple enough for even a moron to use effectively. "Mad School Songs For Everyday Activities," script by Frank Jacobs, art by George Woodbridge. "Doc Tari," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Jack Davis; In a parody of the TV series "Daktari," a veterinarian practicing in the Kenyan bush battles poachers and tends to his animal patients with the help of a cross-eyed lion and a chimpanzee nurse and with no help from his human companions. "What is Today's Most Shocking Drug Menace?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #110
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 110

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "The Mad Hate Book," script and art by Al Jaffee; Examples of human behavior and circumstances of life that are annoying. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "One Day in a Hospital," script and art by Don Martin; A doctor performs surgery on an unrepentant practical joker. "Songs of Food," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Paul Coker Jr. "The Life of Your Run," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV show "Run For Your Life," a man diagnosed with a terminal disease spends his remaining time taking foolish risks and meeting foolish people. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "What is a Born Loser?", script by Tom Koch, art by Sergio Aragones; Essay on people who seem cursed with bad luck, accompanied by relevant illustrations. "The Lighter Side of Camera-Bugs," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical look at photography enthusiasts. "The Television Network President of the Year," script by Stan Hart, art by Joe Orlando; The executive of a major television network is interviewed. "Fantastecch Voyage," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Fantastic Voyage," five scientists are shrunk to microbe size in order to cure a wealthy man's bad sinuses. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #111
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 111

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Stokely and Tess," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; The civil rights movement written to fit the musical play "Porgy And Bess." "Comic Strip Heroes Taken From Real Life," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Bob Clarke; Real life celebrities are turned into comic strip characters. "Where Our Tax Dollars Go," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Jack Rickard; Examples of frivolous things the government spends money on. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias; The Black Spy suckers the White Spy into a rigged arm-wrestling match. "Outdoor Sports Indoors," script and art by Al Jaffee; Methods of playing outdoor sports inside, since urban sprawl has eliminated going outside to play. "The Lighter Side of Relatives," script and art by Dave Berg. "Fantastic Voyages Based on Everyday Experiences," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; Examples of people being miniaturized to deal with common household problems. "Mad Easter Bonnets Designed For Male Celebrities," script and art by Max Brandel. "The Smartest Ape In Captivity," script and art by Don Martin; A zookeeper drops the key to the gorilla cage in front of one of the gorillas. "The Mad Guide to Vanishing Human Types and Their Modern Replacements," script by Elizabeth Wright Jr., art by George Woodbridge. "Why Spy," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the television series "I Spy," two secret agents travel to Hong Kong undercover as tennis pros looking for a kidnapped atomic scientist/part-time swimsuit model. "What Deadly Killer Threatens Us All?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #112
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 112
    • INCOMPLETE. Pieces clipped. Interrupts art and story. Full length spine split, covers glued to spine of book.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "The Mad Song Textbook," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Joe Orlando; Collection of songs written to delineate various subjects of study. "On the Beach at Ebb Tide," script and art by Don Martin; A man at the beach talks to another person submerged up to his chin. "The Ten Commandments – Revisited" photo story by Max Brandel. "TVarzan," script and art by Dick DeBartolo; In a parody of the TV show "Tarzan," the Lord of the Jungle faces dangerous animals and shows off his buff body while villainous hunters exploit the natives behind his back. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "What Is a Final Exam?", script by Tom Koch and May Sakami, art by Sergio Aragones. "The Lighter Side of Eating," script and art by Dave Berg. "The Mad Psychoanalysis Primer," script by Stan Hart, art by Paul Coker Jr. "A Mad Look at Musicians," script and art by Sergio Aragones. "Historical Events as Covered By Modern News Feature Writers," script by Paul Peter Porges, art by George Woodbridge. "The Amateurs," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "The Professionals," a wealthy rancher hires a group of trigger-happy cowboys to rescue his hot wife, who has been abducted by Mexican bandits. "The Paleontologist," script and art by Don Martin. "What Would Be a Perfect Slogan For the Advertising Industry?", script and art by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #113
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 113
    • Interior is complete. Full length spine split.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. Beetle Bailey strip by Mort Walker. "Some Mad Auto Safety Features," script and art by Al Jaffee; Add-on devices for the auto designed to counteract driver's bad habits. "Water Sports Foto-plays"; Humorous captions are added to wire service photos of various water sports. "The Iron Horselaff," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "The Iron Horse," a shady womanizer wins a railroad in a crooked poker game and attempts to complete construction of the line in spite of interference from interested opponents and his own ineptitude. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "At the Academy of Electric Fan Repair," script and art by Don Martin; A teacher introduces his students to an electric fan. "If Famous Poets Had Written Mother Goose," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Rickard; Nursery rhymes written in the style of William Shakespeare, Ogden Nash, Rudyard Kipling, Carl Sandberg and others. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias; The Black Spy tries to stab the White Spy in his sleep. "The Lighter Side of Going Steady," script and art by Dave Berg; The trials and pitfalls of teenage romance. "Everyday Guts," script by Larry Siegel, art by Bob Clarke; A niche magazine making everyday occurrences seem like harrowing adventures. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Mad Mini-Movies: Dr. Zhicago," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Jack Davis; Parody of the film "Dr. Zhivago": A pompous doctor and his bimbo nurse get involved in the Russian Revolution. "Mad Mini-Movies: Is Paris Boring?", script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Is Paris Burning?," a Frenchman lobbies the Allied forces to oust the Germans from France. "Mad Mini-Movies: Throw-Up," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Bruce Stark; In a parody of the film "Blowup," a self-important fashion photographer bounces from woman to woman, never finding self-satisfaction. "Where Is the Current Trend in Popular Literature Headed?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #114
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 114

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "President Johnson on Madison Avenue"; Contemporary product advertising slogans and copy used as ironic counterpoint to photos of President Johnson. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Don Martin Turns On Portable Radios," script and art by Don Martin. "So How Come...", script by Stan Hart, art by George Woodbridge; An ironic look at double-standards in society. "Sombre," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "Hombre"; a white man raised as a Native American assuming his father's place as a slumlord leads a motley crew of stagecoach robbery survivors back to civilization. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "The Lighter Side of the Mating Game," script and art by Dave Berg; A satirical look at dating rituals. "TV Game Shows Based On Newspaper Headlines," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Jack Davis; Real events, such as missing persons, Senate investigations and social trends are turned into premises for game shows. "Future Complaints," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Joe Orlando; Examples of how complaints about society evolve along with society. "The Cats Are All Bats," script by Larry Siegel, art by Bob Clarke; Social criticism as if it were written and illustrated by Dr. Seuss. "The Shadow Knows," script and art by Sergio Aragones; Examples of a person's shadow acting out their inner feelings. "Ratpacktrol," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the TV series "The Rat Patrol"; a member of Rommel's Desert Forces in North Africa tries to lure a squad of American commandos into a series of traps. "On the Tarzan Set," script and art by Don Martin. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #115
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 115

    "Star Blecch," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "Star Trek," an intrepid but incompetent crew of space explorers tries to combat a plague ravaging a planetary population. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "When the Hertz-Avis Rivalry Really Gets Out of Hand" photo story; Ads for Hertz and Avis Car Rental companies devolve into name-calling. "In a Super Market," script and art by Don Martin; A man shopping in a grocery store keeps causing accidents. "TV Coverage of an Off-Year Election," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Paul Coker Jr.; A network news department tries to make a non-Presidential election interesting. "The Evolution of Dating," script by Larry Siegel, art by George Woodbridge. "A Portfolio of Mad Blooming-Idiosyncrasies," script and art by Antonio Prohias; Different terms illustrated by types of flowers. "Prodigy," script by Stan Hart, art by Joe Orlando; A niche magazine aimed at young geniuses. "The Lighter Side of Young Marrieds," script and art by Dave Berg. "Mad's Pictoral Political Dictionary," script and art by Max Brandel; Real life photos ironically juxtaposed with common phrases. "Grim Pix," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Grand Prix," three arrogant race car drivers compete against each other to see who can win the most races and bed the most women. "What Is One of the Really Exciting Possibilities of a Psychedelic Trip" by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #116
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 116
    • INCOMPLETE. Pages missing. Interrupts art and story.

    "Dirtier By the Dozen," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "The Dirty Dozen"; a no-nonsense officer must train a group of murders, degenerates, psychos and bad actors into an elite assault squad despite his reservations about the plausibility of the plot. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Mad's Christmas Cards to Seasonal Exploiters," art by Jack Rickard; Jack Davis; Don Martin; Bob Clarke; George Woodbridge; Dave Berg; Mort Drucker; Al Jaffee; Paul Coker Jr.; and Joe Orlando. "A San Francisco Trip," script and art by Don Martin; A hippie goes tripping after smoking a banana peel. "Mad's Theatrical Agent of the Year," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Bruce Stark; Steve Allen interviews a theatrical agent about his sleazy business practices. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "A Celebrity's Wallet," script and art by Arnie Kogen; Items that might be found in Dr. Timothy Leary's wallet. "The Lighter Side of Friendship," script and art by Dave Berg; Cynical look at the ramifications of being a friend. "Best Sellers We're Sure to See," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Rickard; Predictions of subject matter for future best-selling books. "Late Night TV Roulette" photo story, script by Arnie Kogen; A man repeatedly flipping between The Tonight Show, an ABC News telecast and an old western movie unintentionally creates a stream of humorous dialogue. "Songs of Pets," script by Frank Jacobs, art by George Woodbridge; Songs written to celebrate the less-savory aspects of living with animals. "Ads We Never Got to See," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Bob Clarke; Examples of ads rejected because of the unintentional humor caused by their poorly worded text. "The Joe Nasty Show," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Davis; A television talk show hosted by a rude, obnoxious, foul-mouthed, contemptuous lout that is loved by the audience for those very characteristics. "What Will Be the Ultimate Idea in "Mod" Fashions?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. "Mad's Great Moments in Politics" photo story, script by Max Brandel; A parody of both President Johnson's Vietnam policy and his exposing his surgical scar to White House beat reporters rolled into one. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #117
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 117

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Will Success Spoil Charlie Brown?", script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Rickard; A former friend of Charlie Brown of the Peanuts comic strip visits the old neighborhood and finds that the characters of the strip have let success change them. "Out West," script and art by Don Martin; A man driving in the desert is menaced by a flock of vultures. "A Mad Look at Sky Diving," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Jack Davis; A cynical examination of the equipment and training that comes with sky diving. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Honest Comments on TV," script by Tom Koch, art by Jack Rickard; How different genres of TV shows would be affected if the interviewees told the truth instead of sticking to safe talking points. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "Air Pollution Problems of the Future," script by Sy Reit, art by George Woodbridge. "The Lighter Side of Clothes," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical look at American fashion and its effect on perception of other people. "Welcome Aboard Speeches," script by Sy Reit, art by Joe Orlando. "Mad's Medical Mother Goose," script by Larry Siegel, art by Al Jaffee; Nursery rhymes written to satirize the medical profession. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "The Sam Pebbles," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "The Sand Pebbles," a surly sailor aboard a U.S. Naval vessel meets a corrupt priest and his dimwitted daughter in Southeast Asia. "What Is the Most Expensive Accessory Item Young Car-Buyers Purchase?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #118
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 118

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    Last 30-cent cover price. Cover art by Norman Mingo. "In the Out Exit," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Up the Down Staircase," an idealistic teacher attempts to teach in a crime-ridden inner city school. "Pro Football," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Davis; A former football player turned announcer narrates a comparison of pro football in its infancy with contemporary pro football. "Don Martin Looks At Frogs," script and art by Don Martin; A series of humorous incidents involving frogs. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "TV Shows...Re-Cast" photo story, script by Max Brandel; featuring Hugh Hefner; Dean Martin; Zsa-Zsa Gabor; Muhammed Ali; The U.S. Supreme Court; and Alfred E. Neuman. "The Lighter Side of Fear," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical look at what people fear and how they deal with that fear. "Mad Valentines to Celebrities," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Rickard. "Mission: Ridiculous," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the TV series "Mission: Impossible"; a team of secret agents try to retrieve stolen microfilm in the most suspicious way possible. "The Advantages of the Suburbs For Kids," script by Larry Siegel, art by Paul Coker Jr. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "Mad's Snappy Answers To Stupid Questions," script and art by Al Jaffee. "Hippie Magazine," script by Arnie Kogen, art by George Woodbridge. "The New Back-Scratcher," script and art by Don Martin. "What Is the Worst Threat to Recovery Hospital Patients Can Suffer?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.30.

  • Issue #119
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 119

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    First 35-cent cover price. Cover art by Norman Mingo. "One Day in the Park," script and art by Don Martin; A man sitting on a bench is annoyed by another man with a kaleidoscope. "Balmy and Clod," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Bonnie and Clyde," two really adorable bumpkins decide to embark on a life of crime. Cartoons drawn in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "One Day in the Jungle," script and art by Don Martin; A jungle man tries to grab a beautiful explorer, but misses. "The Mad Fad-and-Fetish Primer," script by Stan Hart, art by Bob Clarke; An examination of fads and fetishes in American society, presented in the form of a children's primer. "Mad's 1968 All-Star Basketball Teams," script by Tom Koch, art by Jack Davis. "What Is a Square?", script by Arnie Kogen, art by Sergio Aragones; Analysis of what makes someone a social outcast in current society. "The Lighter Side of Hobbies," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical look at what people collect and why. "Songs of Wealth, Possessions, Greed, Property and Creeping Materialism," script by Frank Jacobs, art by George Woodbridge; The lyrics of popular songs are altered to reflect contemporary greed. "A Mad Portfolio of Some Famous Protest Buttons We'd Like to See Worn By Some Famous People" photo story, script by Max Brandel; featuring Hubert Humphrey; Jerry Lewis; Richard Nixon; Robert Kennedy; Ethel Kennedy; Gamel Abdul Nasser; Ronald Reagan; J. Edgar Hoover; Sophia Loren; Julie Andrews; Billy Graham; Twiggy; Lyndon Johnson; and Alfred E. Neuman. "The Invasioners," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Jack Davis; In a parody of the TV series "The Invaders," a lone human tries to warn an uncaring world about the invasion of inept aliens. "What Dedicated Group Does a Lot of Planting, and Yet Nothing Ever Comes of It" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. Parody of Shell Oil TV commercials, script by Lou Silverstone, art by George Woodbridge. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #120
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 120

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "One Day at the Beach," script by Sergio Aragones, art by Don Martin. "Blue-Eyed Kook," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "Cool Hand Luke"; a disaffected man ends up in a southern chain gang where he rebels against everything and everybody. "The Mad Hate Book II," script and art by Al Jaffee; Examples of how life conspires to ruin your day. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes at the Post Office," script by Larry Siegel, art by Paul Coker Jr. "Mother's Day Cards Down Through History," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Bob Clarke. "The Lighter Side of Driving," script and art by Dave Berg. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Mad's Simplified A B C Method of Bulling Your Way Through Final Exams," script by Tom Koch; A list of essay answers with fill-in-the-blank sections to adapt the answers to various subjects. "While Strolling Through the City," script and art by Don Martin; A man and a woman strolling down the street notice businesses with descriptive street signs. "Jobs On the Fringe of Show Business," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by George Woodbridge. "Some Mad Articles You Never Got to See," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Paul Coker Jr., Bob Clarke, Mort Drucker, Jack Davis, Joe Orlando, Dave Berg, and George Woodbridge; The first pages of features previously rejected by the editors. "On the Road With Sergio Aragones," script and art by Sergio Aragones; A series of cartoons satirizing highway driving. "The Great Society Alphabet Book," script and art by Max Brandel; Every letter of the alphabet is juxtaposed with a picture of modern live and a simple verse outlining the hypocrisy of Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society" in comparison. "What Is the One Thing Most School Dropouts Are Sure to Become?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. "A Modern Cinderella" back cover story, script by Jack Kent, art by Jack Rickard. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #121
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 121

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Valley of the Dollars," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "Valley Of The Dolls"; three young women try to make it in Hollywood in the face of drugs, sexual harassment, failed relationships and the fact that none of them can act. "Everyday Varieties of Psychedelic Fun," script by Mark Bricklin, art by George Woodbridge; Different things in life that can affect the mind in similar fashion to LSD. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Don Martin Looks At All Them Indians," script and art by Don Martin; A collection of cartoons satirizing various western-genre movie cliches. "The Mad Getting Married Primer," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Jack Rickard; Satire of the conventions of wedding ceremonies. "The Lighter Side of Swimming Pools," script and art by Dave Berg. "More Specialized Self-Defense Books," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Joe Orlando; Self-defense books targeted toward specific demographic groups. "Mad's Cliche Conversation Killers," script by Stan Hart, art by George Woodbridge. "A Nostalgic Look at Sandlot Baseball," script by Dean Norman, art by Paul Coker Jr.; A look back at how boys played baseball before organized Little League baseball. "Alley-Oops," script and art by Sergio Aragones; An armed robber finds slim pickings in the way of potential victims. "New Protests to the Same Old Tunes," script by Tom Koch, art by Bob Clarke; The tunes of sixties war protest songs are given new lyrics for new problems. "The Flying Nut," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the TV series "The Flying Nun": a staid Puerto Rican convent resists the radical changes attempted by a hip young nun. "Spy vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #122
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 122

    Cover art by Mort Drucker (candidates) and Norman Mingo (Alfred E. Newman). "Mad's Modern Believe It or Nuts 8," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Bob Clarke; Parody of the "Ripley's Believe It Or Not" panel cartoon; A collection of satirical anecdotes of unusual people and places. "Mad's Updated Comic Strip Heroes," script by Max Brandel, art by Bob Clarke; The faces of real life celebrities are pasted onto the bodies of various comic strip characters for ironic effect. "Genteel Ben," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Don Martin; In a parody of the television series "Gentle Ben," an Everglades park ranger and his annoying family live and interact with a grizzly bear who is more civilized than they are. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "A CBS-TV Summer Memo to the Smothered Brothers," script by Ronnie Nathan, art by Jack Rickard; Three examples of CBS Network memos to the Smothers Brothers, telling them in gentle verse to stop being political and just be funny. "A Mad Look at Movie Monsters," script and art by Sergio Aragones; Satirical results to basic cliche film monster movie scenes. "Spy Vs. Spy" Mad Fold-In by Antonio Prohias. "Mad's TV Game Show Originator of the Year," script by Stan Hart, art by Joe Orlando; The producer of low-brow, embarrassment-oriented game shows is interviewed. "Mad Magazine's Ideal Presidential Candidate," script by Lou Silverstone (plot) and Max Brandel (layout), art by Max Brandel (layout); Individual features from ten prospective Presidential candidates are combined to form the face of a single compromise candidate. "The Hippie Man," script by Connie Del Vento, art by George Woodbridge; Scenes from the film "The Music Man," complete with musical numbers, with hippies substituted for the main characters. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias; The White Spy thinks he's trapped the Black Spy in his own dungeon. "When We Have the Future Long, Long Cigarette," script and art by Al Jaffee. "The Lighter Side of Hair," script by Dave Berg, art by Dave Berg. "You May Have Already Read This," script by Eli Stein, art by Joe Orlando; Various notes and letters from everyday life, written in the style of a Publisher's Clearing House contest solicitation. "Mad Mini-Movies: Guess Who's Throwing Up Dinner," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "Guess Who's Coming To Dinner"; a flighty woman takes her black fiance to meet her prejudiced father. "Mad Mini-Movies: In Cold Bleeech," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "In Cold Blood"; two indifferent detectives stumble onto the murderers of a simple, boring American family. "Mad Mini-Movies: The Post-Graduate," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #123
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 123

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Adventures of The Red Baron or Happiness ist ein Kleine Kaput Beagle," script by Frank Jacobs and Bob Muccio, art by Jack Rickard; Series of comic strips, drawn in the style of Charles Schultz, depicting the battles between Snoopy and The Red Baron from the German perspective. "Can a Lot," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the musical "Camelot," the president of a canned wax fruit corporation deals with the plots and drama of his board and his cheating wife. "Mad's Home Movies," script by Dean Norman, art by Paul Coker Jr.; Scenes from home movies of a family's less than memorable vacation. "The Lighter Side of High School Football," script and art by Dave Berg; Examples of the ridiculous side of high school football games and the people who attend them. "A Psychedelic Diary," script by Dick DeBartolo; Pages from a diary recording the hallucinations of the author after sampling LSD. "Mad's Academy Awards For World Celebrities" photo story, script by Max Brandel and Frank Jacobs; featuring Hubert Humphrey; Frank Sinatra; Mia Farrow; Ho Chi-Mihn; Adam Clayton Powell; Richard Nixon; Charles DeGaulle; Dean Rusk; George Romney; Nelson Rockefeller; Eugene McCarthy; H. Rap Brown; and Dr. Timothy Leary. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "One Evening at the Health Club," script and art by Don Martin. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes at a Service Station," script by Larry Siegel, art by George Woodbridge. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Free-Loader: The Magazine for Deadbeats," script by Stan Hart, art by Joe Orlando; A niche magazine aimed at people dedicated to getting other people to pay for their lives. "Mad Mini-Vision: Jugg for the Defense," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "Judd for the Defense," a humorless attorney must represent the spoiled brat son of a prominent citizen. "Mad Mini-Vision: Mannecch," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the TV series "Mannix"; a not so bright private detective bungles all the cases his corporate employers assign him. "Mad Mini-Vision: It Takes a Crook," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "It Takes a Thief," an amorous thief is extorted into acting as a field agent for a secret government agency, when he can stop chasing girls. "In What Battle Zone Are the Most Shocking Atrocities Being Committed?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #124
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 124

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Rosemia's Boo-Boo," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Rosemary's Baby," a young couple moves into an apartment building filled with sinister people. Soon the pregnant woman fears her baby may be Satan's child. "One Day in Baghdad," script and art by Don Martin; A rookie snake charmer gets the wrong end of a cobra. "Mad's Follow-up Report on Progress," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Bob Clarke; Examples of how technological progress hasn't necessarily made life better. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "A Mad Look at Bugs 'n Worms 'n Things," script by Don Edwing, art by Paul Coker Jr.; Various humorous examples of insects interacting with their environment. "Casey at the Dice," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; In a parody of the poem "Casey at the Bat," a famous craps player tries to beat a table on a hot streak. "If Polls and Surveys Had Been Used Through History," script by Sy Reit, art by George Woodbridge; Examples of how history would have been altered if those involved had listened to pollsters. "What is a Make-out Man?", script by Arnie Kogen, art by Sergio Aragones; Essay on why women have a natural attraction to some men. "A Mad Show-Biz Success Story," script by Dean Norman, art by Don Martin; A downtrodden man finds hope of success when he discovers a fish who can sing and dance. "Songs of Crime, Violence, War, Hate, Bigotry, the Lunatic Fringe, and All-Around Ecchiness," script by Frank Jacobs, art by George Woodbridge; Lyrics satirizing various hate groups are set to the music of famous show tunes. "The Lighter Side of Physical Fitness," script and art by Dave Berg; Parody of people attempting to exercise. "Christmas is...", script by Gilbert Barnhill, art by Al Jaffee; Series of cynical examples of how Christmas has been corrupted by commercialism and greed. "MafiaCo Incorporated," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Jack Rickard; Corporate stockholders report on the previous year's profits and losses for a crime organization. "What Gift Will Many Holiday Party Revelers Pick Up on the Drive Home?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #125
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 125

    Photo cover by Irving Schild. "201 Minutes of A Space Idiocy," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "2001: A Space Odessey"; two astronauts are sent to investigate a monolith found on the moon. "Don Martin on the Golf Course," script and art by Don Martin. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "A Portfolio of Mad Portraits," script and art by Max Brandel; featuring John Lindsey; Liberace; Hugh Hefner; Ronald Reagan; Charles DeGaulle; Gamel Abdul Nasser; Eugene McCarthy; Pablo Picasso; Timothy Leary; J. Edgar Hoover; Twiggy; and Richard Nixon. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "The Lighter Side of Teenage Dances," script and art by Dave Berg. "A Mad Look at Sex Education in the Schools," script and art by Jack Kent. "Mad's Book Publisher of the Year," script by Stan Hart, art by Jack Rickard; Mad interviews a shady book publisher. "The Mad Ice Hockey Primer," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Davis. "The Mad Poetry Round Robin," script by Frank Jacobs, art by George Woodbridge; Examples of famous poems rewritten in the styles of different famous poets. "If Comic Characters Were Psychoanalyzed," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Bob Clarke. "What Is the One Thing Protest Marches Have Greatly Improved" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #126
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 126
    • 5-1/2" cumulative spine split. Cover detached at one staple.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo (as James Montgomery Mingo). "A Mad Look at the Diseases of Our Sick Society," script and art by Max Brandel; Wire photos are labeled with the names of actual diseases for ironic effect. "Familiar Affair," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the TV series "Family Affair"; a bachelor and his butler reluctantly take in the three sickeningly adorable children of his dead brother. "Outside a Novelty Shop," script and art by Don Martin; A man seeks a means of avenging a practical joke played on him. "Mad's 1968-'69 Football Low Lights," script by Al Jaffee, art by Jack Davis; National Football League plays are examined from the perspective of the triumphant participant and from the perspective of the participant defeated. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Spy vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes at an Airport," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Rickard. "You're in Trouble...When They Smile," script by Stan Hart and Chris Hart, art by George Woodbridge; Examples of how you can sense that you're in an embarrassing or dangerous situation. "The Mad Plan to Beautify America," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Bob Clarke; Examples of how to reduce highway sign clutter by combining billboards and traffic signs. "The Lighter Side of American Tourists," script and art by Dave Berg; Examples of boorish behavior from American tourists abroad and from the foreign people entertaining those tourists. "The Typical Success Story," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; Comparison of films with the plot of a young man searching for personal fulfillment, one made in the forties and the other made in the sixties. "Which Modern Artist Is Most Successfully Communicating with His Audience?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. "The Beat Generation" back-story by Sergio Aragones. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #127
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 127

    Cover art by Jack Rickard. "One Day on the Prairie," script by Sergio Aragones, art by Don Martin. "Signs of Status," script by Al Jaffee, art by Bob Clarke; Clothing or objects with messages imprinted on them denoting how affluent the owner is. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Further Adventures of the Red Baron, or Security Ist Ein Grounded Beaglehundt," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Rickard; The recurring clashes of Snoopy and the Red Baron, told from the Red Baron's point of view and drawn to approximate Charles Schultz's comic strip style. "Odd Squad," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "The Mod Squad," three runaways are recruited by the police as undercover operatives and sent on inherently silly missions. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "If The President Were Chosen Like Miss America," script by Earle Dowd, art by Jack Rickard; The 1968 Presidential campaign is represented as a beauty pageant. "A Mad Look at Realistic Dolls" photo story, script by Harold Morrison, photos by Irving Schild; Children's dolls G.I. Joe and Barbie are given realistic back-stories. "The Lighter Side of the Generation Gap," script and art by Dave Berg. "The Mad Plan For Combatting the Boredom of Baseball," script by Earle Dowd, art by Jack Davis; Exploring changes to the game of baseball to liven it up. "Bullbit," script by Al Jaffee, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Bullitt," after an attack on his partner by organized crime, a police detective conducts a one-man war on those responsible. "What Industry Contributes More to Air Pollution than Any Other?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #128
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 128

    Cover art by Bob Clarke. "The Guru of Ours," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film version of "The Wizard of Oz," a rural girl is borne by a tornado into a strange and bizarre land: A modern urban center. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "On a Saturday Afternoon," script and art by Don Martin; A man spends a less-than-successful afternoon skydiving. "A Mad Nature Study Guide" photo story by Max Brandel and Frank Jacobs; featuring Jane Fonda; Spiro Agnew; Richard Burton; Elizabeth Taylor; Bob Dylan; Mao tse-Tung; Doris Day; Fidel Castro; Tiny Tim; Gamel Abdul Nasser; Charles DeGaulle; and Adam Clayton Powell. "The Heart Transplant," script and art by Al Jaffee. "Mad's Foreign Film Producer of the Year," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Joe Orlando; Mad interviews a film producer who is more interested in the quality of his profits than the quality of his films. "The Lighter Side of Amusement Parks," script and art by Dave Berg; Examples of boorish and bad behavior at amusement parks. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes: At a Laundry & Dry Cleaners," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Davis; Cynical look at the inner workings of a professional laundry. "The Heist," script and art by Sergio Aragones; A safe-cracker must work on the move. "A Mad Look at Two College Generations," script by Larry Siegel, art by George Woodbridge; Comparison of the behavior of college classes of 1949 and 1969 from the same university. "What Is the One Unhappiness Almost All Modern Parents Are Sure to Share with Their Children" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #129
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 129

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Don Martin Takes a Look at a Fairy Tale," script and art by Don Martin; Gruesome retelling of the story of Rapunzel. "Mad Origami Zoo of Cliche Creatures," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Guiseppe Baggi; Origami figures folded out of paper with specific images printed on the paper for ironic effect. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "The Brother Hoods," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; An American marries into a Sicilian family, travels to Sicily in order to join the Mafia, and finds that nobody there belongs to the Mafia. "The Mad Primer of Bigots, Extremists and Other Loose Ends," script by Frank Jacobs and Stan Hart, art by Jack Davis; An examination of various political and social extremist movements, done as a children's reading primer. "The Mad Approach Toward Bridging the Generation Gap," script by Earle Dowd, art by Paul Coker Jr.; Outlining a right way and a wrong way to deal with teenage behavioral problems. "The Lighter Side of Status Seeking," script and art by Dave Berg; Satire of upwardly mobile people. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "A Mad Look at Dogs," script and art by Sergio Aragones. "Mad Gray Paper: The State of Our Cities," script by Stan Hart, art by George Woodbridge; A television news crew does a documentary on inner city housing conditions. "Dr. Benjamin Spock Teenager Care," script by Larry Siegel, art by Bob Clarke; Advice guide on how to raise and cope with a teen. "Jewella," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "Julia," a stunningly beautiful, successful nurse tries to raise her son on her own and search for a husband at the same time. "What Were the Investigations Into the "Pueblo Affair" Really Looking For?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #130
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 130

    "If This Nudity Trend in Movies Ever Spreads to the Comics," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Jack Rickard; Comic strips incorporate nude scenes into their joke punch lines. Cartoons on the margins by Sergio Aragones. "While Clamming in New Jersey," script and art by Don Martin; Two men dig up what they think is a clam. "Mad's 1969 College Riot Preview," script and art by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; Examination of college campus rioting, done in the style of a preseason college football publication. "Land of the Giant Bores," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "Land of the Giants," seven people stranded on a world of giant humans try to make their situation even mildly interesting. "What is a Kid Brother?", script by Tom Koch, art by Sergio Aragones; Essay on enduring having a younger brother. "The Lighter Side of Summer Jobs," script and art by Dave Berg; Examples of the pitfalls of summer employment. "The Mad Plan For Halting the Hijacking of Planes," script by Sy Reit, art by George Woodbridge. "The Mad Book of Etiquette and Good Manners," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Bob Clarke; eries of examples of where and how to use good manners in real life. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes: At The Pentagon," script by Larry Siegel, art by George Woodbridge; Examination of the unprofessional behavior behind closed doors at The Pentagon. "Where Vultures Fare," script by Larry Siegel, art by Angelo Torres; In a parody of the film "Where Eagles Dare," the military commissions a joint U.S./British commando raid on a German army headquarters, much the same way two previous films had. "What Does the Future Hold For Our Great American Pastime?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. Back cover photo of Jack Palance as Fidel Castroin in a publicity still from the motion picture "Che!" 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #131
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 131

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "A Mad Look at Modern College Courses" photo story, script by Max Brandel; College course descriptions are illustrated with photos of college rioting for ironic effect. "On a Cruise to a South Sea Island," script and art by Don Martin; Two tourists find a surprise in a Polynesian wishing well. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Boredom-12," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "Adam-12," two Los Angeles police officers patrol their district ignoring crimes unless they involve attractive women. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias. "Passionate Gun Love," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Davis; A niche magazine for people who really, really like guns. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes: At a Hospital," script by Larry Siegel, art by Al Jaffee. "The Kidney Transplant," script and art by Don Martin. "If Everyone Talked Like Don Rickles," script by Earle Dowd, art by Angelo Torres. "The Lighter Side of Wheels," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical look at how people deal with objects with wheels. "Who Knows What Evil Lurks in the Hearts of Men? The Shadow Knows," script and art by Sergio Aragones; Series of cartoons where a person's shadow indicates what that person is really thinking. "Hoo-Boy, Columbus," script by Tom Koch, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "Goodbye, Columbus"; a middle class Jewish man tries to date an upper class Jewish woman and suffers class discrimination from her family. "What Great New Chasm Has Been Discovered That Dwarfs Even the Grand Canyon" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. Back cover phony ad for Ronreagan brand rum, intimating that former actors running for political office spurs alcohol abuse. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #132
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 132

    Cover photo by Lester Krauss. "Mad's Modern Believe It or Nuts 9," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Bob Clarke; Parody of the cartoon panel "Ripley's Believe It or Not." "Peace on Earth, Good Will Toward All Men," script by Max Brandel; News photos altered to make it seem like philosophical enemies are embracing as friends; featuring Edward Kennedy; Richard Nixon; Dr. Timothy Leary; Rev. Billy Graham; Gen. William Westmoreland; Gamel Abdul Nasser; Golda Meir; Mao tse-Tung; Chaing Kai-shek; Jacqueline Kennedy; Jacqueline Susanne; Muhammed Ali; Tom Smothers; Dick Smothers; Hugh Hefner; Pope Paul VI; William F. Buckley; Stokely Carmichael; and George Wallace. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "On the Trail with a Zoologist," script and art by Don Martin; An ornithologist chooses to follow the tracks of a bird he thinks is less dangerous. "The Academy Awards Show We'd Like to See," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; The Academy Awards adds new award categories to accommodate changing sexual mores in modern films. "Sergio Aragones Takes a Mad Look at Protest Demonstrations," script and art by Aragones; Cynical look at protest demonstrations and society's reaction to them. "The Lighter Side of Birthdays," script and art by Dave Berg; Examination of how we celebrate birthdays and their implications. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Playthings Based on TV Commercials," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Bob Clarke; Basing the concepts for toys and games aimed at children on famous television commercials and advertising slogans. "The Month Before Christmas," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Don Martin; Rewritten version of Clement Clark Moore's "Twas the Night Before Christmas" to reflect modern consumerism. "Mad Peek Behind the Scenes at the Phone Company," script by Earle Dowd, art by Angelo Torres; Cynical look at the inner workings of the phone company. "Condemner Reports," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Bob Clarke; In a parody of the magazine "Consumer Reports," products are rated based on dubious standards. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "What New Trend Is Destroying a Time-Honored Theater Art?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #133
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 133

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "True Fat," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "True Grit"; a spoiled brat teams up with a drunken marshal and a dimwitted Texas Ranger to track down the man who murdered her father. "The Facts of Life (& Death)," script by Ronnie Nathan, art by Jack Davis; Examples, in verse, of how our modern lifestyle is slowly killing us. "If TV Shows Were Actually Like Their Capsule Descriptions," script by Earle Dowd, art by Angelo Torres; Television programs provide the literal content of their TV Guide summaries. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "During a Summer Shower," script and art by Don Martin. "The Lighter Side of Family Gatherings," script and art by Dave Berg. "What Is a Born Winner?", script by Al Jaffee, art by Sergio Aragones; Analysis of what makes certain people luckier than others. "Mad's Lifetime Chart of Attitudes and Behaviors," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Paul Coker Jr.; Examples of how perceptions of current issues change as a person ages are told. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes at the U. S. Congress," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Bob Clarke. "A Mad Look at Celebrities in Real-Life Situations," script by Larry Siegel, art by John Johns. "Mad Green Paper: The State of Our Suburbs," script by Stan Hart, art by George Woodbridge; Suburban life is examined by a television news reporter. "What Is One Special Benefit Derived From Modern Rock Music By Some of Its Fans" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #134
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 134

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Ditched in the South Pacific," script and art by Don Martin; A man adrift in the ocean inflates a raft. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Midnight Wowboy," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Midnight Cowboy," an idiot Texan befriends a lowlife New Yorker while they try to make a living in the big, bad city. "Mad's Frozen Foods That Fake-Out Fresh," script by Sy Reit, art by Irving Schild. "Spray Can Sprays We'd Like to See," script by Stan Hart, art by George Woodbridge; New concepts in aerosol products. "The Lighter Side of Money," script and art by Dave Berg. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "I Remember, I Remember the Wondrous Woodstock Music Fair," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Sergio Aragones; Satirical remembrance, in verse, of the Woodstock Music Festival. "The Ghost and The Mrs. Misses," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the TV series "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir," a widow lives in a house with the ghost of a sea captain only she can see. "Ads We Can Look For After the Next Successful Space Mission," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Bob Clarke. "One Night at the Fights," script and art by Don Martin. "Mad's Up-Dated Modern Day Mother Goose," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; Nursery rhymes describing current celebrities. "A TV Scene We'd Like To See," script by Chevy Chase, art by John Cullen Murphy; In a short parody of the TV series "Mission: Impossible," Mr. Phelps gets an unexpected assignment. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #135
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 135

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    Cover art by Jack Davis. "Sleazy Riders," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "Easy Riders"; two young men on motorcycles tour the back roads of the United States, searching for the "Real America." "One Day Downtown," script and art by Don Martin; A man gets a karmic response for stepping on an insect. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Life From the Broadside," script by Sidney Paulson, art by Jack Rickard; Examples of how the same behavior elicits different value judgments if the person exhibiting the behavior is a male or a female. "The Mad Book of Magic & Other Dirty Tricks," script and art by Al Jaffee; Satirical examples of how stage magic illusions are performed. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes at a Fancy Restaurant," script by Larry Siegel, art by Sergio Aragones. "The Lighter Side of Worry," script and art by Dave Berg; The behavior of people concerned about things are satirized. "More Up-to-Date Health & Safety Songs for Children," script by Larry Siegel, art by George Woodbridge; Songs for children promoting good health and safety practices. "Then Came Bombsome," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Angelo Torres; Parody of the TV series "Then Came Bronson"; a disillusioned reporter tours the United States, searching for "The Real America" and trying not to seem too much like "Easy Rider." "The Richard M. Nixon Presidential Primer," script by Larry Siegel; Richard Nixon outlines why he will be a good President to a juvenile audience. "Who Is Fast Becoming Our All-Time Top Comic Character" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. Image on the back cover of Richard Nixon addressing the press wearing a Spiro Agnew face mask. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #136
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 136

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Botch Casually and the Somedunce Kid," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid," two wild west outlaws rob, steal, have fun and generally act adorably. "One Day in a Tenement," script and art by Don Martin. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "The Lighter Side of Sex," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical examples of the sexual attraction between genders. "Spy Vs. Spy," script and art by Antonio Prohias; The Black Spy booby-traps his observation headquarters. "Feature By Feature Advertising" photo story by Dick DeBartolo, photos by Irving Schild; Ads that go overboard pointing out each desirable feature of a product. "A Mad Look at College," script by Stan Hart, art by Jack Davis; A satirical look at the antics and interactions at a modern university. "Obituaries for Traditions, Pasttimes and Other Dying-Out Landmarks of the American Way of Life," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Norman Mingo. "Mad's Vice-President of the Year," script by Stan Hart, art by John Cullen Murphy; Satirical profile of Vice-President Spiro Agnew, following him as he performs his basic job of being a complete public buffoon, making the President look good in comparison. "More So How Come...?", script by Stan Hart, art by George Woodbridge; Examples of how the same situation can be viewed differently from different perspectives. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Room 222ZZZZZZZZZ," script by Stan Hart, art by Angelo Torres; Parody of the TV series "Room 222"; a handsome, popular teacher is part of the staff of the most boring, unrealistic inner city high school in existence. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #137
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 137
    • Interior is complete. Extensive accumulation of defects.

    Cover art by Jack Rickard. "Boob And Carnal And Tad And Alas," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; A satire of the movie, "Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice." "Great Non-Violent Guns !", script and art by Don Martin. "The Lighter Side Of Summer Resorts," script and art by Dave Berg. "A Boy-Dog Named Lassie," script by E. Nelson Bridwell, art by Jack Davis; A parody of the song, "A Boy Named Sue", featuring Lassie. "Sports Cars We'd Like To See," script and art by Basil Wolverton; A series of gags featuring whacky cars designed by the insane mind of Basil Wolverton. "Spy VS. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "If The World's Greatest Painters Drew The Comics," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Rickard; Famous painters drawing comic strips in their unique style. "21st Century Outdoors Magazine," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by George Woodbridge; A mock magazine focusing on outdoor life and man's involvement in destroying it. "Makeus Sickby M.D.," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Angelo Torres; A parody of the TV series, "Marcus Welby, M.D." 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #138
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 138
    • Interior is complete. Full length spine split.

    Cover art by Jack Rickard. Ad for Mad paperback books. "Moroned," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; A satire of the movie, "Marooned." "One Day At The Ocean," script and art by Don Martin; Surf's up for a ship wrecked survivor. "A Sports Fan's Garden Of Verses," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; Poems based on various sports themes; Poems included are: Broadway Joe; Skis; The Sportsman's Hour Doubleday; I must Go Out To The Track Again; Lew Alcindor; On The Road To Baltimore; Come Bowl With Me & The Hometown Goalie. "How To Read A Resort Ad," script by Gilbert Barnhill, art by George Woodbridge. "If Peanuts Were A Weekly TV Series," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Jack Rickard; If the Charlie Brown specials were turned into a weekly TV series, the shows concepts would be: Young Doctor Brown; Peanuts Squad; Peanuts Place; Charlie Brown, Attorney For The Defenseless. "The Lighter Side Of Transportation," script and art by Dave Berg. "Spy VS. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Those Wonderful Sixties ! A Year 2000 Backward Look At A Warm And Wonderful Decade" photo story, script by Larry Siegel. "M*I*S*H M*O*S*H," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Angelo Torres; A parody of the movie, "M*A*S*H." Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #139
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 139

    Cover art by Jack Davis. "The Vampire" inside front cover strip by Sergio Aragones; A vampire gets the true meaning of peace when he drains the blood of a hippy. "Airplot," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker A satire of the movie, Airport. "A Mad Look at Tokenism of the Future," script by Vic Cowen, photos by Irving Schild; Photo gags showing how ad agencies can go too far when pushing token minorities. "The Lighter Side of... the Revolutionary Movement," script and art by Dave Berg; Dave Berg's Lighter Side of gag section focusing on a singular topic, The Revolutionary Movement. "Mad's Guaranteed Effective All-Occasion Non-Slanderous Political Smear Speech," script by Bill Garvin, art by George Woodbridge. "Still Life," script by Jerry Robinson, art by Jerry Robinson; A collection of political gags featuring inanimate objects. "Silent Majority the Magazine for Middle America," script by Larry Siegel, art by George Woodbridge; A mock magazine focusing on Middle American lifestyles. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes at an Ad Agency," script by Larry Siegel, art by Jack Rickard. "Ads For Movie Revivals," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Bob Clarke; Updating classic straight-laced films like Born free; Moby Dick; Ten Commandments & Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs with a more adult sex themed angle. "Ironride," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Angelo Torres; A TV satire of Ironhide. "One Day In A Crash Pad," script and art by Don Martin. Art in the margins by Sergio Aragones. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #140
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 140
    • Interior is complete. Full length spine split.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Put*On," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Patton," the Allies win World War II in spite of the psychotic sadist in charge of the tank brigade. "One Day on Location," script and art by Don Martin; On the set of a "King Kong" film, the lead actor has a special talent for the role. "The Lighter Side of Bad Habits," script and art by Dave Berg; Satire of things that people do that really annoy other people. "Mad's Christmas Carols for the 1970 Season," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Rickard; The lyrics of traditional Christmas carols are altered to reflect current events. "If There Had Been Advice Columns Throughout History," script by Lou Silverstone, art by George Woodbridge. "A Mad Look at Birds," script and art by Sergio Aragones; Collection of cartoons satirizing humanity's interaction with birds. "You Know You're Really a Football Fan When...," script by Stan Hart, art by Jack Davis; Examples of behavior that identifies a person as an obsessed football fan. "Mad Christmas Cards From Celebrities," script by Max Brandel; featuring photos of Richard Nixon; H. Rap Brown; Abbie Hoffman; Golda Meir; George Wallace; Graham Kerr [as The Galloping Gourmet]; Richard Daley; Spiro Agnew; Don Rickles; Eldridge Cleaver; Hugh Hefner; and William Fulbright. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "The Doris Daze Show," script by Stan Hart, art by Angelo Torres; In a parody of the TV series "The Doris Day Show," a widow faces her boring job, unrealistic financial situation and the amorous intentions of every man she meets with the same perky optimism. Parody of Winston cigarette print ads. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #141
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 141

    Cover art by Jack Rickard. "Catch-All-22," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Catch-22," at an American air base in the Italian Theater in World War II, a pilot tries everything he can think of to get out of the Army Air Force while insanity occurs all around him. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "On a Streetcorner Downtown," script and art by Don Martin. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Get It Out of Your System Land," script by Sy Reit, art by George Woodbridge; Theme park that allows patrons to perform anti-social acts. "Marching Songs for Crusaders, Militants and Assorted, Sundry Non-Conformists," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; Old standards with new lyrics satirizing rebels in society. "A Mad Look at Tropical Fish," script by Earle Doud, art by Bob Clarke; Overview of the types of tropical fish available as pets and their care. "The Lighter Side of Clubs and Organizations," script and art by Dave Berg. "Spy Vs. Spy" Antonio Prohias. "How-Are-Ya, Five-0?", script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Angelo Torres; In a parody of the TV series "Hawaii Five-0," a dense police detective and his squad of equally dense subordinates search Hawaii for a missing Hawaiian artifact. "What Is Contributing Most to the Breakdown of Communication Between People?" Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #142
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 142

    Last 35-cent cover price. "West Coast Story," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; A musical parody of the peace movement, the counter-culture who participate in it and the members of "The Establishment" who oppose it. "Communism Revisited" photo story, script by Max Brandel; Quotes from Marxist and Communist leaders are placed in counterpoint with photos of reality for ironic effect. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Violent TV Commercials," script by Earle Doud, art by Mort Drucker; If the sudden graphic violence trend of contemporary films was extended to contemporary television commercials. "Horrifying Cliches 9," script by May Sakami, art by Paul Coker Jr; Ordinary phrases are given monstrous illustrations, such as "embracing a belief" or "avoiding a confrontation." "What Is a Parent?", script by Tom Koch, art by Sergio Aragones; Essay on what are the joys and duties of a modern parent. "The Lighter Side of Love," script and art by Dave Berg; Examples of romance that don't always go according to plan. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Mad's Dirty Old Man of the Year," script by Stan Hart, art by George Woodbridge; Mad interviews a man who exploits the counterculture for his own benefit. "My Three Sonny Boys," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Angelo Torres; In a parody of the TV series "My Three Sons," a widower raises his boring family while not fully coming to grips with contemporary society. "On the Hunchback of Notre Dame Set" one-page strip by Don Martin. Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.35.

  • Issue #143
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 143

    First 40-cent cover price. Cover art by Norman Mingo. "On a Clear Day You Can See a Funny Girl Singing 'Hello Dolly' Forever," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of Barbra Streisand star vehicles, a college student is examined under hypnosis by a psychologist; He discovers that she has starred in several major Hollywood films, essentially playing the same character. "Nixon & Agnew, As Seen By..." photo story; The faces of Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew are superimposed onto the bodies of other political group members to show how they are perceived by various factions of the public. "One Day in a Bus Depot," script and art by Don Martin; A man goes to the manufacturer to complain because a vending machine barber gave him a poor haircut. "The Lighter Side of Baby Sitting," script and art by Dave Berg. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Altar Ego," script by Marylyn Ippolito, art by Wally Wood; A Catholic bishop outlines to a Protestant priest how he plans to maintain his high end lifestyle in a poor parish. "The Game Is Inane," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Angelo Torres; In a parody of the TV series "The Name of the Game," the bumbling editors and publisher of a news magazine get their administrative assistant in all sorts of trouble while pursuing news. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "ABC's Campus Riot of the Week", script by Tom Koch, art by Jack Davis; Anti-war protests presented as a college football game telecast. Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.40.

  • Issue #144
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 144

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Schmoe," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Joe," an upper class father murders the drug addict boyfriend of his daughter, then teams up with a borderline psychotic construction worker to search the city's counterculture hangouts for his missing daughter. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "The Mad Non-Smoker's Hate Book," script and art by Al Jaffee; Examples of how inconsiderate smokers annoy people who don't smoke. "The Lighter Side of Sound Equipment," script and art by Dave Berg. "One Afternoon at the Beach," script and art by Don Martin. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "The F.I.B.", script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Angelo Torres; In a parody of the TV series "The F.B.I.," two F.B.I. agents track down diamond thieves while making sure that the products of the show's sponsor are prominently displayed. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes at a Recording Studio," script by Earle Dowd, art by Jack Davis; A look at the behind closed doors antics at a commercial recording studio. "Incredible Occult Magazine," script by Frank Jacobs, art by George Woodbridge; A niche magazine dedicated to documenting supernatural occurrences. Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.40.

  • Issue #145
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 145
    • Full length spine split. Missing interior panel.

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. Ad for MAD paperback books. "Five Easy Pages!", script by Lou Silverstone, art by Mort Drucker; Everyone drops out of their lives to find something more meaningful, including the artist and writer. "Very Early One Morning," script and art by Don Martin; A man exercises with an unusual form of pushups. "A Mad Look at Then...and Now (Or We've Come a Long Way, Baby!)", script by Max Brandel; Comparisons of old culture to new culture. "The Lighter Side of Boating," script and art by Dave Berg; A look at the strange things people do when boating. "That Sinking Feeling…"; Various quotes of President Nixon regarding the Vietnam War, arranged chronologically to show the change of focus. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "What Coaches Say," script by Paul Peter Porges, art by Jack Davis; Things sports coaches say about their player in public, compared to what they say in private. "Greeting Cards for the Sexual Revolution," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Bob Clarke. "A MAD Look at Palm Reading," script and art by Sergio Aragones. "Excuses, Excuses!", script by Dick DeBartolo and Donald K. Epstein, art by George Woodbridge; Comparison of typical excuses of times past and today. "Prison Record Albums of the Future," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Jack Rickard. "The Foul and the Prissy Cats," script by Stan Hart, art by Angelo Torres; A parody of the movie "The Owl and the Pussycat," about a writer and prostitute who end up living together. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.40.

  • Issue #146
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 146

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "Lover's Story," script by Larry Siegel, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Love Story," a rich college boy romances an ethnic girl below his social station in spite of pressure from his parents, and then she dies--beautifully. Cartoons drawn in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "This Is America," script by Max Brandel; Photos are juxtaposed ironically in order to satirize contemporary United States society; Includes photos of Richard Nixon; Spiro Agnew; Alfred E. Neuman; Neil Armstrong; and Robert Kennedy. "The Lighter Side of the Now Look," script and art by Dave Berg; Satirical look at contemporary youth fashions and behavior and the reaction to it by the previous generation. "The Very First Musical Instrument," script and art by Don Martin; A cave man invents the flute, then invents music criticism. "The Mad Effluent Society Pollution Primer," script by Sy Reit, art by Angelo Torres; The effect of pollution on modern American society and its influence on the members of that society. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Mad Interviews a Typical Middle American Family," script by Lou Silverstone, art by Paul Coker Jr.; Dick Cavett interviews a suburban couple in a typical American city. "Recruiting Posters Through History," script by Paul Peter Porges, art by George Woodbridge; Recruitment posters, based on the famous "Uncle Sam wants you" poster from the U.S. Army, are fashioned for multiple historical military actions. "A Mad Look at Amusement Parks," script and art by Sergio Aragones; Humorous incidents from amusement parks are portrayed. "One Fine Day a Million Years Ago," script and art by Don Martin. "Reality Street," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Jack Davis; In a parody of the TV show "Sesame Street," local residents and puppets try to teach simple lessons amid the decay and danger of an inner city slum neighborhood block. Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.40.

  • Issue #147
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 147

    "Little Dull Man," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "Little Big Man"; a one hundred twenty-one year old man recalls for an interviewer his life as the biggest schmuck in the old west. "An Italian Robin Catching a Worm," script and art by Don Martin. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Future Shock," script and art by Sergio Aragones; A man dismisses the outlandish predictions of a reputed fortune teller. "The New Army," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; Examples of how the military has changed with the times. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "If Nixon Were President During Custer's Last Stand," script by Lou Silverstone, photo by Irving Schild; President Nixon tries to stonewall the press's inquiries into the Massacre at Little Big Horn. "The Lighter Side of Time," script and art by Dave Berg; How people deal with the demands of punctuality. "A Mad Look at Pet Owners," script by Stan Hart, art by Bob Clarke. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Modern Muscle Magazine," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by George Woodbridge. "Gall in the Family Fare," script by Larry Siegel, art by Angelo Torres; In a parody of the TV series "All In The Family," the bigoted head of a dysfunctional family spouts his opinions to anyone and everyone while waiting for a reunion with an old army buddy. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.40.

  • Issue #148
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 148

    Cover art by Norman Mingo. "If the Characters in Peanuts Aged Like Ordinary People," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Bob Clarke; Glimpses of the age-progressed cast of "Peanuts" at various stages of their lives. "The Trauma of '42," script by Stan Hart, art by Mort Drucker; Parody of the film "The Summer of '42"; an awkward teen has a series of awkward encounters with an older woman waiting for her husband to return from the war. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Don Martin in a Play-Land," script and art by Don Martin; A man has a series of problems with an arcade game. "The Lighter Side of Living Space," script and art by Dave Berg; Satire of modern society's attempts to deal with urban sprawl. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "Mad's Rhyming Guide to Pro Football," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; An explanation, in rhyme, of the positions, strategies and coverages of pro football. "A Mad Look at Waterbeds," script and art by Paul Peter Porges. "Messy's Thanksgiving Day Parade," script by Dick DeBartolo and Kedzie North, art by Angelo Torres; Satire of the silly floats and balloons of the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, the antics of the people who watch it, and the network television coverage of it. "The Daily Congressional Off-The-Record" photo story by Lou Silverstone, photos by Irving Schild; A newsletter covering Congress and the actions of the elected representatives. Parody of a Wishbone Salad Dressing television ad. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.40.

  • Issue #149
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 149
    • 1/2" spine split from base of comic.

    Cover art by Jack Rickard. "Road Signs We'd Like to Post," script by Max Brandel; Traffic signs are superimposed on photos of real events and celebrities for ironic effect. "One Dark and Lonely Night," script and art by Don Martin; A man makes an obscene phone call. "Truly Relevant TV Shows," script by Tom Koch, art by Angelo Torres; Examples of television series that have had their formulas modified to be more relevant to contemporary society. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "The Sports Spectators' Hall of Fame," script by Tom Koch, art by Jack Davis; Busts of fictional sports fans who represent specific types of fans. "Spy Vs. Spy" by Antonio Prohias. "The Lighter Side of Dropping Out," script and art by Dave Berg; Examples of people walking away from society, its expectations or its petty annoyances. "A Mad Guide to TV Late Show Cliché Movie Props," script by Paul Peter Porges, art by Angelo Torres; Examples of props you're sure to find in specific movie genres. "Distinctive Birth Announcements," script by Frank Jacobs. "A Mad Peek Behind the Scenes at a Moving Company," script by Lou Silverstone, art by George Woodbridge; Examples of deceptive or arrogant behavior from professional moving companies. "Willies," script by Dick DeBartolo, art by Mort Drucker; In a parody of the film "Willard," a young man, smothered at home and oppressed at work, takes revenge with the help of hordes of rats. Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.40.

  • Issue #150
    Mad (1955 Magazine #24 On) 150

    "The Tourist" inside cover strip, script and art by Antonio Prohias; A man books a south sea vacation, but doesn't exactly get what he hoped for. "The White House Follies of '72," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Mort Drucker; Life in the Nixon White House, presented as a Gilbert & Sullivan operetta. Cartoons in the margins by Sergio Aragones. "Ads That Turn People Off," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Bob Clarke; Examples of print ads that don't exactly put the product in the best light. "More Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions," script and art by Al Jaffee; Examples of sarcastic responses to obvious questions, including a blank balloon to encourage audience participation. "One Fairly Nice Day Downtown," script and art by Don Martin; A man decides to step on an ant, to his regret. "A Mad Message to the Leading Democratic Candidates for President," script and art by Dave Gantz; The Democratic contenders for the 1972 Presidential nomination are given the noses of other famous people in order to raise their public favor. "When TV Makes Full Use of Howard Cosell," script by Frank Jacobs, art by Jack Davis; Casting Howard Cosell in other television situations, such as appearing on Sesame Street and reporting on the weather. "A Mad Look at Snow Mobiles," script and art by Paul Peter Porges. "The Lighter Side of Air Travel," script and art by Dave Berg. "The Putrid Family," script by Arnie Kogen, art by Angelo Torres; In a parody of the TV series "The Partridge Family," a family made up of an over-the-hill musical star, her vain teen idol son and a group of supporting children tour America as a pop band. Mad Fold-In by Al Jaffee. 52 pgs., B&W. Cover price $0.40.