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Comic books in 'Hulk'

  • Issue #1-1ST
    Hulk Broken Worlds TPB (2009) 1-1ST

    1st printing. Collects Hulk Broken Worlds (2009) #1-2, Hulk Family (2008)#1 and X-Men vs Hulk (2009 Marvel) #1. Written by PAUL BENJAMIN, ROY THOMAS, FRED VAN LENTE, PETER DAVID, ADAM WARREN, MARC SUMERAK, JASON HENDERSON, PAUL TOBIN, GREG PAK and CHRIS CLAREMONT. Art by DIEGO LATORRE, CLAYTON HENRY, HERB TRIMPE, RODNEY BUCHEMI, STEVE SCOTT, KELSEY SHANNON, JUAN SANTACRUZ, JHEREMY RAAPACK, BENTON JEW, SCOTT CLARK and JONBOY MEYERS. Cover by DAVID YARDIN and WIL QUINTANA. Across the infinite stretches of the multiverse, countless worlds are forever changed by the monster known as the Hulk... but must his tale always end in tragedy? Join us as we revisit Marvel's alternate worlds for new tales of the rampaging green goliath! Go on a journey to the House of M, the Microverse, a Future Imperfect, Age of Apocalypse, the Days of Future Past, the Marvel Mangaverse, and the years 1602 and 2099! Then, you know the HULK, but it's time you met his whole family. From Bruce's cousin She-Hulk to those who've inherited his irradiated genes, Hulk's family tree is looking a little greener all the time. Featuring: the Senstational She-Hulk, Skaar, the Daughter of Hulk and Thundra! Plus: legend Chris Claremont delivers an epic battle between the Hulk and Colossus! Softcover, 144 pages, full color. Cover price $15.99.

  • Issue #1
    Hulk Chronicles World War Hulk (2008) 1

    Written by GREG PAK & PETER DAVID Penciled by GARY FRANK, AL RIO, LEE WEEKS & SEAN PHILLIPS Cover by JOHN ROMITA JR. Experience WORLD WAR HULK - the super-hero-smashing, city-leveling, bone-crushing, Marvel-history-making event - and its major tie-ins in chronological order! Hulk is coming, and no power on Earth can stop him from getting revenge on the Illuminati! In INCREDIBLE HULK #106, find out which of Earth's heroes will fight FOR the Hulk! Amadeus Cho, the boy genius who once took on Reed Richards on behalf of the Hulk, confronts She-Hulk and Doc Samson - and precipitates a gamma-powered smash-fest in the wilds of Jersey! And in WORLD WAR HULK PROLOGUE: WORLD BREAKER, learn what events led up to the super-human battle-to-end-all-battles. As Hulk's great stone ship approaches the planet, he prepares for the war on the horizon by reliving past conflicts with Iron Man, the Fantastic Four, Doctor Strange and the Inhumans. Also featuring an expanded recap of the events of PLANET HULK! 72 PGS./Rated T+ ...$4.99 Cover price $4.99.

  • Issue #2
    Hulk Chronicles World War Hulk (2008) 2

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    Written by GREG PAK & PAUL JENKINS Penciled by JOHN ROMITA JR. & RAMON BACHS Cover by DAVID FINCH Experience WORLD WAR HULK - the super-hero-smashing, city-leveling, bone-crushing, Marvel-history-making event - and its major tie-ins in chronological order! Exiled by a group of Marvel 'heroes' to the savage alien planet of Sakaar, the Hulk raged, bled and conquered - rising from slave to gladiator to king. Now, the Hulk returns to Earth to wreak his terrible vengeance on Iron Man, Reed Richards, Dr. Strange and Black Bolt - and anyone else who gets in the way. Stronger than ever, accompanied by his monstrous Warbound gladiator allies and possessed by the fiercest and purest rage imaginable, the Hulk may just tear this stupid planet in half. The epic story of anger unbound begins in WORLD WAR HULK #1! And in WORLD WAR HULK: FRONTLINE #1, get your street-level view of the Hulk's invasion! The Green Goliath has returned to Earth on a collision course with some of Marvel's mightiest heroes...so what does that mean for the ordinary people caught in the crossfire? Ben Urich and Sally Floyd pound the pavement to uncover the story behind the story! Plus: Who wants our tireless reporters to take down J. Jonah Jameson, and how do they want them to do it? 72 PGS./All Ages Cover price $4.99.

  • Issue #3
    Hulk Chronicles World War Hulk (2008) 3

    Collects World War Hulk (2007) #2 and Incredible Hulk (1999 2nd Series) #108. Written by Greg Pak. Art by John Romita, Jr. & Klaus Janson and Leonard Kirk & Scott Hanna. Cover by John Romita, Jr. & Klaus Janson. The puny human 'heroes' of Earth, including Reed Richards, Iron Man, Dr. Strange and Black Bolt, called the Hulk a monster and shot him into space. Now the Hulk has returned with a rage that knows no bounds -- and he has a posse! Can the mightiest powerhouses of the Avengers stop the Hulk and his cadre of super-powered Warbound gladiators as they carve their path of mayhem through the concrete canyons of Manhattan? Can battling Ben Grimm and the rest of the Fantastic Four save Reed Richards from the Hulk's wrath? And what hope can She-Hulk have of calming her great green cousin's terrible rage? And...by hook and by crook, teen genius Amadeus Cho has done the impossible -- assembling a team of heroes crazy enough to side with the Hulk upon his return to Earth. But what happens when these Renegades finally come face-to-face with the Hulk's alien Warbound allies -- while civilians struggle to survive in the shattered streets of Manhattan? Amadeus Cho may just learn the difference between playing a hero -- and being one. 72 pages, full color. Cover price $4.99.

  • Issue #6
    Hulk Chronicles World War Hulk (2008) 6

    Collects Incredible Hulk (1999 2nd Series) #111 and World War Hulk (2007) #5. Written by Greg Pak and Jeff Parker. Art by Leonard Kirk and John Romita, Jr. & Klaus Janson. Cover by David Finch & Danny Miki. When World War Hulk began, Hercules, Angel, Namora and Amadeus Cho formed an unlikely band of heroes crazy enough to consider taking the Hulk's side in his war against the Marvel Universe. But will the stunning events of Incredible Hulk (1999 2nd Series) #110 tear the Renegades apart? And how can they hope to defeat the hellish new threat rising from the wreckage of Avengers Tower? Then...the millennium's most massive Marvel smashfest careens towards its cataclysmic conclusion! Four so-called Marvel 'heroes' shot the Hulk into space. Their exploding shuttle destroyed his people and pregnant queen. And the Hulk has taught them what their arrogance has wrought. But now the Hulk faces the puny humans' greatest champion. And as the terrible battle rages, who will stand revealed as the hero -- and who will be proved the monster? Who knows the difference between vengeance and justice? And who will pay the terrible price of anger? 72 pages, full color. Cover price $4.99.

  • Issue #1
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 1

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven (1st appearance) is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #2
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 2

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #3
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 3

    March 21, 1979. Hulk (Parkhouse/Bolton), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/John Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Kirby), Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd), and Hulk (Englehart/Trimpe). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #4
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 4

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    March 28, 1979. Hulk (Parkhouse/Neary/Richardson), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Kirby), the Eternals (Kirby), Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd), and Hulk (Englehart/Trimpe). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #6
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 6

    April 11, 1979. Hulk (Parkhouse/Neary/Richardson), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Kirby), the Eternals (Kirby), and Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #7
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 7

    April 18, 1979. Hulk (Stern/S. Buscema), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Kirby), the Eternals (Kirby), and Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #8
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 8

    April 25, 1979. Hulk (Stern/S. Buscema), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Kirby), the Eternals (Kirby), and Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #9
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 9

    May 2, 1979. Hulk (Parkhouse/Neary/Richardson), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Lieber/Kirby), the Eternals (Kirby), and Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #10
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 10

    May 9, 1979. Hulk (Parkhouse/Neary/Richardson), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Kirby), the Eternals (Kirby), and Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #11
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 11

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    May 16, 1979. Hulk (Parkhouse/Neary), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Kirby), the Eternals (Kirby), and Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #12
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 12

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    May 23, 1979. Hulk, the Black Knight, Nick Fury, Ant-Man (Lee/Lieber/Heck), the Eternals (Kirby), and Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #13
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 13

    May 30, 1979. Hulk (Parkhouse/Neary/Richardson), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lieber/Heck), the Eternals (Kirby), and Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #14
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 14

    June 6, 1979. Hulk (Parkhouse/Neary/Lloyd), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man, the Eternals (Kirby), Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd), and Hulk (Thomas/Trimpe). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #15
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 15

    June 13, 1979. Hulk (Moore/Neary/Lloyd), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Lieber/Heck), the Eternals (Kirby), Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd), and Hulk (Thomas/Trimpe). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #16
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 16

    June 20, 1979. Hulk (Moore/Neary/Lloyd), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Lieber/Heck), the Eternals (Kirby), Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Lloyd), and Hulk (Thomas/Trimpe). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #17
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 17

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #18
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 18

    July 4, 1979. Hulk (Moore/Neary/Lloyd), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man, the Eternals (Kirby), Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Bolton), and Hulk (Thomas/Trimpe). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #19
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 19

    July 11, 1979. Hulk (Moore/Neary/Lloyd), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Nick Fury (Moore/Dillon), Ant-Man (Lee/Lieber/Heck), the Eternals (Kirby), Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Bolton), and Hulk (Thomas/Trimpe). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #20
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 20

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    July 18, 1979. Hulk, Captain Britain origin, Ant-Man (Lee/Huntley/Kirby/Heck), the Eternals (Kirby), Night-Raven (Parkhouse/Bolton), and Hulk (Glut/S. Buscema). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #21
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 21

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #22
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 22

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    Aug. 1, 1979. Hulk (Claremont/S. Buscema), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Ant-Man (Lee/Huntley/Kirby/Heck), Nick Fury (Goodwin/Springer), the Eternals (Kirby), and Hulk (Glut/S. Buscema). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #23
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 23

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    Aug. 8, 1979. Hulk, the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Ant-Man, Nick Fury (Goodwin/Springer), the Eternals (Kirby), and Hulk/What If. This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #24
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 24

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    Aug. 15, 1979. Hulk (Claremont/S. Buscema), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Ant-Man, Nick Fury (Hart/Trimpe), the Eternals (Kirby), and Hulk (Glut/S. Buscema). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #25
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 25

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    Aug. 22, 1979. Hulk (Claremont/S. Buscema), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Ant-Man, Nick Fury (Hart/Trimpe), the Eternals (Kirby), and Hulk (Glut/S. Buscema). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #26
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 26

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    Aug. 29, 1979. Hulk, the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Ant-Man (Lee/Huntley/Heck), Nick Fury (Hart/Trimpe), and Hulk (Stern/S. Buscema). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #27
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 27

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    Sept. 5, 1979. Hulk (Moore/Neary/Lloyd), the Black Knight, Ant-Man (Lee/Huntley/Heck), Nick Fury, the Eternals (Kirby), and Hulk/Captain America. This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #28
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 28

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    Sept. 12, 1979. Hulk (Moore/Neary), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Ant-Man (Lee/Huntley/Heck), Nick Fury (Friedrich/Springer), the Eternals (Kirby), and Hulk/Captain America (Stern/Michelinie/S. Buscema). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #30
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 30

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    Sept. 26, 1979. Hulk/Captain America, the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Ant-Man, Nick Fury, and the Eternals (Kirby). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #31
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 31

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    Oct. 3, 1979. Hulk (Stern/S. Buscema), Captain Britain origin, Ant-Man (Friedrich/Trimpe), Nick Fury (Friedrich/Springer), and the Eternals (Kirby). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #32
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 32

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    Oct. 10, 1979. Hulk, Captain Britain origin (Claremont/Trimpe), Ant-Man, Nick Fury, and the Eternals (Kirby). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #33
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 33

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #34
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 34

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #35
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 35

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #36
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 36

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #37
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 37

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #38
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 38

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #39
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 39

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #40
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 40

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #41
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 41

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #42
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 42

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    Dec. 19, 1979. Hulk (Stern/S. Buscema), the Silver Surfer (Lee/J. Buscema), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Ant-Man, and the Defenders. This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #43
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 43

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    Dec. 26, 1979. Hulk (Stern/S. Buscema), the Silver Surfer (Lee/J. Buscema), the Black Knight, Ant-Man (Friedrich/C. Russell), and the Defenders (Kraft/Slifer/Giffen). This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #44
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 44

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    Jan 2, 1980. Hulk (Stern/S. Buscema), the Silver Surfer (Lee/J. Buscema), the Black Knight (Parkhouse/Neary/Stokes), Ant-Man (Friedrich/C. Russell), and the Defenders. This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #45
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 45

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #46
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 46

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

  • Issue #47
    Hulk Comic (1979-1980 Marvel UK) Hulk Weekly 47

    This item is not in stock. If you use the "Add to want list" tab to add this issue to your want list, we will email you when it becomes available.

    This title lasted 63 issues before merging with Marvel UK's Spider-Man title. Like many titles published by the company under Dez Skinn, Hulk Comic featured new material produced by British creators such as Steve Dillon, David Lloyd and Steve Parkhouse, along with a smattering of American reprints drawn from the Lee/Kirby Marvel back-catalogue. Once Skinn was replaced by Paul Neary, however, the title's original output dwindled, being supplanted by an increasing number of reprints. The title included new Hulk material drawn by Dave (Watchmen) Gibbons and Steve (Preacher) Dillon. This material was significant in that it portrayed the illiterate, wandering Hulk of the 1970s television series. Once the title began featuring American reprints, it chose to display the Marvel Universe Hulk as depicted by Sal Buscema. Hulk Weekly is best remembered for reviving Captain Britain, which had previously been US-originated material. Other original work included Nick Fury also drawn by Steve Dillon and a new Black Knight strip which also featured Captain Britain. These original stories were mostly restricted to the first 20 issues of the title, before tailing off to make way for U.S. reprints, with the Black Knight strip running through most further issues until the title's cancellation. Nevertheless, Hulk Comic is particularly significant for launching the character of Night Raven by Steve Parkhouse and David Lloyd. Night Raven is one of several Marvel UK characters to eventually made the jump to the mainstream (US) Marvel Universe.

    NOTE: Title changes to Incredible Hulk Weekly #47-58.